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Topic review - 1:160 S.M.S. WESPE Armoured Gunboat (1876)
Author Message
  Post subject:  Re: 1:160 S.M.S. WESPE Armoured Gunboat (1876)  Reply with quote
Completing the upper carriage 3

Progress in homeopathic doses: I realised that I forgot the the two steps at the end of the upper carriage. So, the parts for the frame were laser-cut, pieces of tea-bag mesh inserted and the assembly attached to the carriage with lacquer.

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Steps for the gun-layer

I realised now that I had assembled so many tiny parts for the gun, that it became difficult to not loose them and to remember what they were for. Some of the parts indeed had been made years ago. Therefore, I will proceed now to paint the parts and to assemble the gun, which then will be placed as a whole into the barbette, once the model is getting close to be finished.


Preparations for painting

While the paint scheme overall is quite clear, as it had been laid down in an ordinance of 1874, a few details have caused and still do cause some head-scratching. One of them is the exact hue of the ‘yellow’ for the funnel and the two boiler-room ventilators.

Unfortunately, no colour recipes seem to have survived, if there had been any. I undertook some research by proxy, reviewing what other navies at the same time might have done. The paint scheme of the French navy of that time is very different, but that of the Royal Navy is quite similar (or perhaps the other way around). For instance, HMS GANNET, preserved and restored in Chatham, is from the same period. Due to the Corona-crisis the reponse from Chatham to an enquiry is still incomplete. I wanted to know what paint was used in her restoration. Looking through artistic representations of the time, one has the feeling that the yellow was paler and more like buff, than the one used later by the Imperial German Navy.

It is notoriously difficult to judge hues on computer screens and on printed colour cards. To begin with, I selected a range of possible colours from my stock and also went through the colour cards of Schmincke, Vallejo, and Prince August (the French trade name for Vallejo). These candidates I tried out on pieces of the material to painted.

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Colour samples

The hull will be black outside and white inside, the deckhouse and the inside of the barbette will be also white. The decks, where not wood, will be a dark grey, as they had been painted in tar with sand mixed in to make them less slippery.
The gun carriage will be painted green, as evidenced by some contemporary builders’ models and a somewhat later instruction manual. The hue of the green is another issue. It was probably based on chrome oxide green.

The barrel of these breech-loading guns was scraped clean, then wiped with vinegar until a brownish oxide layer developed. The process was repeated several times and any loose ‘rust’ wiped off. Finally, the barrel was rub down with lineseed oil, effectively producing in situ a paint with ferric oxihyroxide and ferric acetate as pigment. The resulting colour would be something like caput mortuum. This is the way the barrel of the demonstration model in Copenhagen seems to have been treated. Moving parts and mechanically relevant surfaces were keept clean carefully, of course. I will, therefore, lightly spray the barrel in Schmincke caput mortuum.

To be continued ...
Post Posted: Thu Aug 27, 2020 12:44 pm
  Post subject:  Re: 1:160 S.M.S. WESPE Armoured Gunboat (1876)  Reply with quote
Thanks, Jim. This exactly has been always my concern: to give the parts their scale thickness and 3D shape. Etching is a very useful process, but in many cases etched parts as such are just too thin or too flat. There is an appropriate manufacturing technique for each part.
Post Posted: Thu Aug 27, 2020 3:35 am
  Post subject:  Re: 1:160 S.M.S. WESPE Armoured Gunboat (1876)  Reply with quote
Wefalck wrote:

>>> .... It continues to frustrate how little I have to show for a few hours of toiling in the workshop,...<<<

ACTUALLY.... I disagree! :cool_1:

The close up images of the elevating mechanism reflect EXACTLY the extreme time spent;

This work is SUPERLATIVE--- and no amount of ' shortcut ' PE would ever achieve this feeling of
solidity in this relatively large scale.

a hearty bravo!

JIM B :thumbs_up_1: :thumbs_up_1:
Post Posted: Wed Aug 26, 2020 4:58 pm
  Post subject:  Re: 1:160 S.M.S. WESPE Armoured Gunboat (1876)  Reply with quote
Thanks for the kind words !

I had linked the pictures through https, but my certificate expired and I have not been able to renew it yet. I changed the links to http and it should work again now.
Post Posted: Wed Aug 26, 2020 9:59 am
  Post subject:  Re: 1:160 S.M.S. WESPE Armoured Gunboat (1876)  Reply with quote
Very nice work.

Somehow the pics from the updates from May 29th, June 10th and June 28th don't show anymore... I know, bit late with that ;-)
Post Posted: Wed Aug 26, 2020 7:18 am
  Post subject:  Re: 1:160 S.M.S. WESPE Armoured Gunboat (1876)  Reply with quote
Thanks gentlemen !

What is quite strange actually, is that the building-logs seems to get quite a few visitors, but doesn't seem to raise any discussion items ...

********************

Completing the upper carriage 2

Owing to the lurking second Corona-wafe we cut our stay in Spain short and returned to Paris early in order not to get stuck at the border. The government were indeed pondering a renewed closure. Whether Paris was the better choice remains to be seen, as case numbers are soaring here too. At least I have my workshop here and I was able to spend some holiday time in it.

It continues to frustrate how little I have to show for a few hours of toiling in the workshop, but I keep telling myself that I am single fighter, while in real life large shipyard crews from various specialist trades would have worked on such a project ...

The gear segment for the elevating mechanism of the barrel was produced by turning a short piece of aluminium pipe that I happened to have in stock to the correct inside and outside diameter. The teeth then were cut on the micro milling-machine using the dividing head in a horizontal position. Then slots were sawn at the angular distance required and then a slice of the required thickness parted off. The ends of the segments were finally filed to shape. I did not take pictures of this process. Aluminium is a bit bright, but I will at the end tone it down with a soft pencil and it will also dull with age.

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Below one of the sections of the gear segments for the elevating mechanism

For the brackets with which the gear segment was attached to the reenforcement ring of the gun barrel a piece of brass rod was turned out to the correct inside diameter. On the mikro-mill with the dividing attachment in upright position the other faces were milled to shape. Finally, the individual bracket were sawn off with a circular saw at the correct thickness. The parts, which are just over 1 mm long, were chemically tinned to adapt them somewhat to the steel colour of the barrel. As they will not have to withstand any mechanical forces, they were glued to the reenforcement ring with zapon lacquer.

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Indicator disc for the elevating mechanism on the instruction model in Copenhagen

There were still a few details missing on the upper carriage, for instance the indicator disc for the elevating mechanism. How this indicator is coupled to the elevating mechanism I was not able to find out. It is not shown on the drawings, it is not visible on the model in Copenhagen, and the respective parts are missing from the guns in the Suomenlinna fortress. There was probably a gear train on the inside of the carriage. For this indicator disc a piece of 2 mm brass rod was faced off and a mock gradation engraved with a toolbit turned onto its side in 6° steps. There is a steel indictor lever (the function of which is not clear to me, either the disc turned or this lever, probably the former). For this a steel disc was turned with a short arbor and transferred to the micro-mill, where the shape of the lever was milled out. This indicator disc seems to have been fitted only to the starbord side of the carriage.

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Engraving the indicator disc for the elevating mechanism on the lathe

Furthermore the brake-handels for the elevating mechanism were missing. A short piece of 0.25 mm diametre copper wire was flattend in the middle with a 0.8 mm diametre punch in the watchmaker’s staking tool. The resulting round flat part was soldered to a short distancing bushing and turned cap glued on from the other side.

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The elevanting gear provisionally assembled

To be continued ...
Post Posted: Mon Aug 24, 2020 3:06 pm
  Post subject:  Re: 1:160 S.M.S. WESPE Armoured Gunboat (1876)  Reply with quote
that is very painstaking...

and very fabulous ' proper' "engineery " modelling !!

:thumbs_up_1: :thumbs_up_1:

JIM B :wave_1:
Post Posted: Sat Aug 01, 2020 7:15 am
  Post subject:  Re: 1:160 S.M.S. WESPE Armoured Gunboat (1876)  Reply with quote
Beautiful work!

Phil
Post Posted: Fri Jul 31, 2020 11:27 pm
  Post subject:  Re: 1:160 S.M.S. WESPE Armoured Gunboat (1876)  Reply with quote
Quite a long journey actually for such a small boat ...

******************************************************

Completing the upper carriage 1

With the lower carriage basically ready for painting, I turned my attention back to the upper carriage. The structural elements made from photo-etched parts had already been constructed many years ago. Dito some of the details had been fabricated more than ten years ago, or at least partially.

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The previous state of the upper carriage

I had also turned and cut the gear wheels for the elevating mechanism, but they had not been finished. The back side, after parting off had not been shaped, which was done now and they were also chemically tinned after degreasing and pickling in citric acid.

Image
The gears as cut

The elevating mechanism consist of a double reduction gears and is driven by a deeply dished handwheel with six spokes. These reduction gears are duplicated on each side of the carriage. The last wheel in the drive has a pinion on the inside of the carriage, which acts on a gear segment that is attached to the gun barrel. How the gear segment is guided is not clear from the available drawings and the model in Copenhagen. On the Russian Krupp-clones the arrangement is slightly different.

Image
The elevating gear train in GALSTER (1885)

http://www.maritima-et-mechanika.org/ma ... 504-72.jpg
The elevating gears on the instruction model in Copenhagen

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The gear segment and its attachment to the barrel on a gun in the Suomenlinna fortress

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Krupp factory photograph of the same gun, but in coastal mount (from the collection of the Architekturmuseum TU Berlin)

There is a friction-brake on the axle of the last large wheel of the gear train, which is worked with a cross handle. How this functions is not clear, but it presumably just pull the gear onto the frame via a short thread that is cut onto the end of the axle.
On the starboard side of the gun there is a brass disc and an indicator lever that somehow shows the degree of elevation and presumably the range of the gun with different kinds of projectiles and charges. Again, how this indicator disc is coupled to the elevating gears is not clear, as I do not have any suitable photographs. In any case, the respective gear train will not be really visible on the model.
The dished handwheel started life as parts photoetched from 0.2 mm brass. In order be able to bend each spoke into the dished shape, a former was turned from some round steel and set up on the watchmakers ‘staking tool’. The spokes were pre-bend by hand and then finally pulled to shape using a hollow punch. The parts then were chemically tinned and soldered together with the aid of some flux.

Image

Image

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The step-wise forming of the dished handwheel

The remaining parts, such as the axles, are simple parts turned from steel rod for strength, as they are quite long compared to the diameter.

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(Almost) all the parts of the elevating gear laid out

Image

Image
The elevanting gear provisionally assembled

To be continued ...
Post Posted: Thu Jul 30, 2020 4:37 pm
  Post subject:  Re: 1:160 S.M.S. WESPE Armoured Gunboat (1876)  Reply with quote
all that fine detail... buried in a hole....

I guess its the journey that counts !! :thumbs_up_1: :wave_1:
Post Posted: Sat Jul 04, 2020 5:34 am
  Post subject:  Re: 1:160 S.M.S. WESPE Armoured Gunboat (1876)  Reply with quote
The gratings look very nice!

Phil
Post Posted: Sat Jul 04, 2020 12:56 am
  Post subject:  Re: 1:160 S.M.S. WESPE Armoured Gunboat (1876)  Reply with quote
Attaching the gratings

The lower carriage was now ready for installing the gratings. For this purpose some flaps had been foreseen on the supporting brackets. They were cemented to the carriage using the zapon-lacquer which resulted in a surprisingly strong bond.

The stand for the gun-layer was put into place only temporarily for the photograph. The final fixation will be done, when the gun is being installed. It is rather exposed element that would make painting the gun rather difficult.

Image

Image

Image

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The lower carriage with gratings in place from various angles

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The lower carriage put temporarily into the barbette

To be continued ...
Post Posted: Fri Jul 03, 2020 3:51 pm
  Post subject:  Re: 1:160 S.M.S. WESPE Armoured Gunboat (1876)  Reply with quote
Thanks, Jim !

**************

Two steps forward and one step backwards ...

... as I said somewhere above – on Friday the plastic globe on my 12W LED globe-bulb in my architect’s lamp fell out and dropped right onto the lower carriage on the workdesk :mad_2: . One of the caster-roller snapped off and two others were loosened – then I spent an hour turning everything on the table upside-down and didn’t find the roller – then I sifted through the waste-bin nearby for another hour and still couldn’t find it :mad_2: – eventually I gave up, cut a new bracket on the laser-cutter, fitted it and then turned up a new roller. Perhaps should have done it like this in the first place, as one always spends more time in search of a part than it takes to make a new one, but I just could not believe that a part like that could have been ejected so far ...


Still work on the lower carriage ...

OK, the gun is the key feature of a gun-boat and its very raison d’être, but this gun and its carriage seem to develop into a model of its own right. Perhaps one day I should build a larger scale fully working (the mechanics, not the ballistics, which would be probably illegal over here in Europe) model, now that I have a pretty good understanding of its functioning.

While I was drawing some additional parts to be cut with the laser, I realised, that I had completely forgotten the stiffening brackets for caster wheels. They are essential elements in the construction, as the wheels each have to carry around 15 tons of the total weight of the gun. The brackets were fabricated from steel plates and forged(?) angles, fabricated on the model from tiny pieces of Canson-paper cut with the laser.

Image
Stiffening brackets added over the caster-rollers

There were also two brackets needed for the operating lever including connecting rod of the gun training mechanism and for the clutch that connects the cranks below the barbette with the gun. The latter allows to connect gears for two different speed ratios, a high ratio for fine weather and a low ratio through as self-locking worm-gear for foul weather. A quite sophisticated arrangement actually, but as nothing of it will be visible on the model, it was ignored.

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Supporting brackets and connecting rods for working the training gears

Connected to the gun training mechanisms is also a kind of capstan to help run-in the gun. A tackle is hooked into each side of the upper carriage and the runner lead by two guiding wheels into the lower carriage and onto the capstan. The wheels were turned from steel rod and their supporting brackets cut from Canson-paper. I meant to closely reproduce the original design, but in the end had to simplify it, because the parts were simply too small to laser-cut and handle. Because they are so flimsy that had to be put into place now and will have to painted over.

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Rollers in brackets to lead the running-in tackle

The next challenge will be the fitting of the eleven gratings distributed around the lower carriage.

To be continued ...
Post Posted: Sun Jun 28, 2020 4:19 pm
  Post subject:  Re: 1:160 S.M.S. WESPE Armoured Gunboat (1876)  Reply with quote
as ever-- thi is simply STUNNING work!

truly-- most impressive!

JIM B :wave_1:
Post Posted: Fri Jun 12, 2020 5:03 pm
  Post subject:  Re: 1:160 S.M.S. WESPE Armoured Gunboat (1876)  Reply with quote
Further work on the lower carriage

Back to the lower carriage. The (mor or less) central pivot determines its rotational axis, but the weight of the gun is actually supported by four (kind of) caster wheels running on cast-iron rails bolted to the bottom of the barbette.
The rails had been turned already a long time ago. The forks for the caster-wheels were fabricated from laser-cut cardboard. The wheels themselves are simple turned steel discs with a groove.

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Caster wheels prepared for assembly

For the assembly, the rails were taped down onto an appropriately scaled print-out of the original plan of the vessel and carriage fixed with a clothes pin. The wheels and forks are temporarly united by axels made from short lengths of copper wire. The casters then were cemented under the carriage in the correct position with respect to both, the rails and the carriage frame, using again varnish.

Image
Caster wheels in place

The wheels will have to be removed again before painting the carriage, because they will be left in bright steel. I do not know, whether this is correct for the flanges of the wheels, but it gives the whole arrangement are rather ‘technical’ look. The axles with cylindrical end-caps have already been prepared from steel rod and will be installed during the final assembly.

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Caster wheels in place

To be continued ...
Post Posted: Wed Jun 10, 2020 2:27 pm
  Post subject:  Re: 1:160 S.M.S. WESPE Armoured Gunboat (1876)  Reply with quote
Scrollwork and name-plates

As I had tried laser-engraving on cardboard for the gun-layer stand, I wanted to try out this technique also for the scrollwork and the name-plates. Originally, I had foreseen to develop the scrollwork by printing the design onto a decal-sheet and then build it up by sculpting it over the printed lines with acrylic gel. The name-plates could have been surface-etched in brass. One could have etched, of course also the scrollwork in brass and then complete it with acrylic gel.

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Best available image of the bow scrollwork and name-plate

It is not very clear what the scrollwork looked like when new and from what material it was made. The fact that it seems to have persisted intact over the whole life of these ships may indicate that it was actually cast in some metal, rather than carved in wood.
There are no close-up photographs of sufficient resolution in the black-white-yellow paint-scheme. Closer photographs are only available from a later period, when everything was painted over in grey and some of scrollwork may have been picked out in a darker grey. Originally it was probably painted in yellow-ochre with parts of gilded. In any case, available photographs are not clear enough to truly reconstract the scrollwork, so some interpretation was necessary.
In addition to the scrollwork per se, there was a shallow sculpture of the animal after which the ship was named, for SMS WESPE, of course, a wasp. Existing photographs only give a vague idea what these sculptures really looked like. In any case not for SMS WESPE.

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Only available image of the stern scrollwork

There has also been some scrollwork at the stern, but pictorial evidence for this is rather scarce. There is only one known photograph that gives a full view of the stern of this class of ships and this was taken at the very end of their service life. Available copies of this photograph are not clear enough to really discern what the scrollwork actually looked like, so a fair amount of imagination is needed to recreate it.
https://www.maritima-et-mechanika.org/m ... crolls.jpg
Artwork for the bow scrollwork

Creating the basic artwork for the decoration was a multiple-step process. First a photograph of the respective section of the model as built was taken in order to give the necessary proportions. In the next step the best available photograph with the least perspective distortions was chosen and fitted over the model photograph. In another layer of the graphics software (Graphic for iPad) the scrolls were drawn free-hand (with the iPen) using the paintbrush-function and a good amount of smoothing. This artwork was saved as a JPEG. On the Internet I found a nice drawing of a wasp and turned this into a pure b/w image with a good bit of editing in Photoshop. Both, the scrollwork and the wasp were saved as transparent GIF. In my favourite CAD-program (EazyDraw), the parts were mounted together. This could have been done also in Photoshop, but I did have a scaled drawing of the bow-section in EazyDraw to which I exactly fitted the artwork. There were also some addtional parts to be cut.

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Some examples of the (unused) laser-cut scrollwork and the name-plates

The scrollwork was cut/engraved with the laser-cutter using the ‘half-tone’ function, which means that the laser is modulated to emit less power when a grey pixel is encountered and full power, when a black pixel is encountered. I had to play in several iterations with the settings of the laser-cutter in order to arrive at a satisfactory result.

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Scrollwork and name-plate in place

In a first try the name-boards were made in the same way, but the half-depth engraving around the letters resulted in a somewhat fuzzy apearance of the letters. I, therefore, tried out a different idea. From previous trials it was know that the laser had no effect on transparent materials and very limited effect on translucent materials. Hence, I covered some cardboard with a thin layer of Pleximon 192 (essentially liquid, light-hardening Plexiglas). A thorough curing this sandwich was sanded flat and presented to the laser-cutter. The laser removes all the cardboard, but leaves the acrylic virtually untouched, with the exception of some light surface roughness. One ends up with a piece of thin acrylic sheet to which the letters and the scrollwork of the name-board are attached. Within the limits of the resolution (0.05 mm) of the laser-cutter the lettering turned out reasonably clear, perhaps not as crisp, as when photoetched though.

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Stern scrollwork in place

The scrollwork elements were attached to the hull using fast-drying varnish. The actual painting and guilding will be done, once the hull has been painted.

To be continued ...
Post Posted: Thu Jun 04, 2020 1:23 pm
  Post subject:  Re: 1:160 S.M.S. WESPE Armoured Gunboat (1876)  Reply with quote
Folding tool update
After the first use of the tool, I immediately made a couple of modifications, which however, I had expected to introduce anyway.
When working with cardboard or paper one needs to ‘overbend’ the folds somewhat, so that they stay at the desired angle. This is different to working with soft sheet-metal. Styrene sheet also will have this spring effect. Therefore, the folding edges were given a 10° clearance angle. An angle of 15° may have been even better, but it works with the 10°. The edges are not really weakened by this.
The second modification was to place a spring washer under the folding ruler. I had in mind to do this right away, but could not find them in the first place. The washers lift up the ruler a bit, so that it is easier to slip the material under it.

Gun operating platforms and gratings
The gun is mounted effectively on a turntable, so that platforms for crew are needed to give them access to the gun, while is being trained left or right. These platforms are made of wire gratings that are placed into angle-iron frames. The frames are suspended from the lower carriage by brackets. The pictorial evidence (photographs, drawings) is not detailed enough to fully understand what the brackets actually looked like and how and where exactly they were attached to the lower carriage frame. Some additional information is given by the Danish instruction model and the Russian clones in Suomenlinna fortress, but the carriages of these guns differ in detail from that on SMS WESPE. So the reconstruction of these platforms remains somewhat conjectural.

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Crew standing on the gratings and operating the gun

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Gratings of the Danish instruction model

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Detail of gratings on a gun in Suomenlinna fortress

There are 13 gratings and steps in total, plus the platform for the gun-layer. The original plan was to photo-etch the frames from brass sheet, but with the arrival of the laser-cutter I changed this plan. The drawings were modified accordingly. The obvious solution to simulate the angle-iron frame was to design an open frame and then fold-up the vertical parts of the angle. However, it proved impossible to fold the narrow, 0.3 to 0.4 mm strips consistently and without distortions. Not sure this would have worked with the PE parts either. It was then decided to make the open frame and the vertical parts separately as narrow strips and glue them together with lacquer. After several iterations of drawings and laser-cutter settings to arrive a workable width of the strips etc. I arrived at an acceptable solution, albeit the ‘angle-irons’ are somewhat over-scale.

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Example of a drawing for the gratings and their supporting brackets

Assembly was a slow and nerve-wracking process. I did not manage to do more than one grating per evening and it involved a lot of (mental) foul language. Eventually, I got them all together. Zapon-varnish was used throughout the assembly. The finished parts are surprisingly strong

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First Version with engraved surfaces of the platform for the gun-layer

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Final Version of the platform for the gun-layer (5 mm grid on the cutting-mat)

The original plan was to simulate the wire-mesh of the gratings by real wire-mesh and I obtained from wires.co.uk some really fine mesh in brass and steel. The idea was to pull every second wire in one direction, as the original mesh was rectangular. It proved, however, very difficult to cut such small pieces (sometimes only 1.5 mm wide) from the wire-mesh. Then a present to wife in form of a box with various (fruit) teas came to my rescue: some of the teas came in bags made from extremely fine but lightly woven fabric. I do not know what material it is, but as it dissolves in acetone, it is probably cellulose acetate silk or Rayon. Such fabrics are also used in silk-screen printing and I had not chanced upon the tea-bags, I would have looked there. This silk-screen or fabric can be precisely and easily cut with a new scalpel blade. The small pieces of fabric were dropped into the frames and fixed at the edges with a light touch of varnish.

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Tea-bag fabric

The platform for the gun-layer is a more complex structure. A 5 mm sheet-metal armour shield is meant to protect him from shrapnel and small-arms fire. The armour shield is reinforced at the edges with rivetted-on metal strips. The original plan was to produce this as a surface-etched part. I realised that the laser-cutter interprets half-tone images as instructions to modulate the laser power so that it does not cut all the way through. Laser-engraving in other words. It did produce the desired effect, albeit with the engraved surface being rather rough due to the digitising effect. However, this part then was so thin and flimsy, that it would not stay in shape, when attempting to shape the round corner. I reluctantly accepted that it would be somewhat over-scale in thickness and cut the armour shield and the reinforcing strips separately. They were glued on top of each other with varnish and then the round of the shield formed over a rod. Folding and gluing completed the process.

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The collection of gratings and steps

I am not entirely happy with the result and tend to think, that etched parts may have looked finer. But then their assembly would have required a lot of very delicate soldering work – I don’t trust CA for metal/metal bonds too much. On the other hand, attaching the gratings to the lower carriage frame is likely to be easier for the cardboard parts than for brass parts. Before that can be done, I need to add the wheels, which requires a lot of handling ...

To be continued ...
Post Posted: Fri May 29, 2020 12:35 pm
  Post subject:  Re: 1:160 S.M.S. WESPE Armoured Gunboat (1876)  Reply with quote
Thanks, gentlemen !

*********************

Folding tool

As will be seen in the next post, quite a number of delicate laser-cut parts will need to be folded. Therefore, I thought a folding tool might come handy. A number of commercial gadgets are available, but considering that they essentially consist of a couple of milled-to shape pieces of aluminium and a thumb-screw, I find them rather overpriced at €20 to €70, depending on what you buy where. Also, if I have the right materials and tools, I prefer to make such things myself.
I did not have a suitable piece of flat aluminium in stock, so I decided to make it from some 4 mm thick Plexiglas off-cut. This has the added value that you can better see, where you place the folding edge. Plexiglas is more vulnerable than aluminium, but I can always make a replacement, should the need arise.

Image

A set of fingers ranging from 1 mm to 6 mm width were separated by notches made with a 4 mm cutter. The front was bevelled for better access to small parts. The opposite side was left straight for longer parts. For the moment, the front edges where milled at 90° degrees, but I can imagine that a slight overbending would be better. I am considering to mill on a 5° or 10° relief angle, but will first test the piece in practice. A more acute angle will make the edges more vulnerable to chipping. The underside is somewhat recessed over most of the width, so that tool really clamps with the front edge, where it is needed, and does not wobble.

Image

As I also did not have material for a base in stock, I decided to use the base of the sanding tool that I made a while ago. It has the added value that no extra gadget is floating around the workshop. The folding ruler was drilled and two corresponding holes in the base were drilled and tapped for M3 thumb-screws.
Post Posted: Thu May 07, 2020 3:01 pm
  Post subject:  Re: 1:160 S.M.S. WESPE Armoured Gunboat (1876)  Reply with quote
The work is up to your excellent standards, as usual!

Phil
Post Posted: Sat May 02, 2020 1:22 am
  Post subject:  Re: 1:160 S.M.S. WESPE Armoured Gunboat (1876)  Reply with quote
Fantastic work.
Post Posted: Fri May 01, 2020 4:27 pm

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