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PostPosted: Tue Jan 10, 2017 6:12 pm 
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as ever--simply superlative methodolgy!!

sharp as a razor!

:thumbs_up_1:

JB

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PostPosted: Thu Jan 12, 2017 2:03 pm 
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I didn't think I could be more impressed but I am. The deck engraving is beautiful and the milling is phenomenal. Your machine tools are stunning. Is it possible to duplicate your machine setups with any products available today? I've looked for good miniature lathe/milling setups and haven't really found any.

I look forward to seeing more of your work. :thumbs_up_1:

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PostPosted: Thu Jan 12, 2017 3:57 pm 
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Thanks, gentlemen, for your praise :thumbs_up_1:

Bob, the lack of modern machinery of comparable quality was one of the reasons I went for my antique machines. However, over the last few years one (or several) Chinese manufacturers (Sieg Industries ?) threw a cheapo watchmakers lathe onto the market. They used to make the Vector-lathes for professionals (not as good as the German Boley, American Levin, or Swiss Bergeon lathes, but much much cheaper) , but now are targetting the hobby market with a very cheap lathe. This lathe can be converted with additional parts into a pillar-drill and a small milling machine. I don't know anything about the real quality, as I never had one in front of me. However, if you consider these Chinese-made machines as projects in an advanced state of machining, you could probably make some good and useful from them.
The machine I was referring to comes in various colours and with different manufacturers' badges. However, they all seem to share the demonination 'N1'.

Here is an US source: http://www.amitmachines.com/mini/nanodrill that sells them as Nano Lathe/Drill/Mill:

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A German importer (GG-Tools, http://gg-tools.com) has them in no so garish gray.

I gather the UK importers, such as Chronos or RDG tools can also supply them.

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PostPosted: Fri Jan 13, 2017 6:59 pm 
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Quite amazing.

Despite having to suspend my own ship modelling temporarily I am still watching IN AWE.

Its also stuff like this which makes me try harder.

Keep the posts coming.

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PostPosted: Sat Jan 14, 2017 3:51 pm 
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:cool_2: ....

**************

Continuing with the barbette: The floor of the barhette is partially covered in planking, presumably to protect the armour-steel deck underneath from the damage that might occur, when the heavy shells are handled. The steel deck underneath and in front of the barbette armour-belt is slightly sloping to deflect incoming enemy-shells from the ammunition storage-rooms. Within the barbette this is filled with timber to make a level floor.

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Three different contemporary drawings showing the barbette

The interpretation of the various items that can be seen in the contemporary drawings is not straightforward. However, one can see a hatch that gives access to the crew's quarters (where also the hand-cranks for turning the gun-carriage is located). Then there is a round hatch for hoisting up the charges from the powder-locker below and a square hatch for hoisting up the shells. From the drawings it appears that these hatches were covered in steel-gratings. There is a further hatch with a double-lid that, according to a hand-written notice on one drawing is a man-hole leading to the ante-room of the shell-locker. However, as it is not drawn in the cross-sections we do not know its height. There are also a couple of racks for shells and some other rack-like features, the purpose of which I do not know - perhaps for tools needed in handling the shells. Unfortunately, there are no photographic images that show the rear of the barbette. Stairs leads down from the bridge into the barbette. In addition two ladders allow quick access from the deck.

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The barbette with various items of furnishing

The floor of the barbette, which apparently did not have any camber, was built up from two layers of Pertinax one representing the steel-plating and engraved accordingly, the second cut out and engraved to represent the wooden flooring.

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Milling and jig-drilling operations on the new micro-mill

The construction of the various hatches gave the opportunity to test the just finished micro-milling machine. The man-hole cover was milled from a small block of Plexiglas. The machine was also used as a co-ordinate drilling machine for getting the holes in the rack in one line and evenly spaced.

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Collection of hatches for the barbette (the grilles still need to be straightened)

To be continued ....

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PostPosted: Thu Dec 21, 2017 5:55 pm 
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It has been almost a year since the last post. I have been too busy business-wise and been side-tracked by various tool-making projects, which seem to be easier to do with the frequent interruptions by business-travels. There has been some small progress, however. Though this was not easy, as I have been struggling with the possibilities of the available materials and with my own skills. The 1/160 is pretty small, if you have set yourself the target to put as much detail into as one would do in say 1/96 or even 1/48 scale ... One of my struggles has been to produce acceptable ladders, on which I will report in the next post.

***********************************

The officers’ mess skylight produced previously did not turn out quite to my satisfaction. It was not as crisp as I had wished. It was build up from layers of bakelite sheet around a milled core of acrylic glass. The mouldings present on the original were simulated by 0.4 mm copper wire milled to half-rounds. This all entailed messing around with cyano-acrylate cement, which is not my favourite and at which I am not very skilled.

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Officers’ mess skylight being milled from a small block of acrylic glass

It then occurred to me that much of all this could be milled from a solid piece of acrylic glass. One has to start from a block that envelopes the maximum width and depth, including the mouldings, and then has has to plan strategically which layers to mill off until the desired shape appears (reminds me of the joke, where an old lady asked a sculptor during an exhibition whether it was difficult to sculpt a lion – the artist replied: not really, madam, one takes a big block of marble and knock off everything that doesn’t look like a lion ...). The mouldings were left standing as square protrusions. They were rounded off using a draw-plate fasioned from a piece of razor-blade and held in a pin-vise. The half-round notch was cut using a thin cut-off wheel mounted on an arbor in the milling machine.

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Micro-drawplate for half-round moldings

It is, of course, not possible to simulate panelling by this method. However, some parts can be left standing and the other completed with thin styrene-strips. For reasons of material stability, I am not such a big fan of polystyrene, it becomes brittle with age, but it has the advantage that it can be ‘welded’ onto acrylic glass or onto itself using dichlormethane. This results in invisible bonds and you cannot smear any glue around.

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Trial of milling out skylight window-frame

The next challenge were the protective grilles that were laid into the wooden frames above the actual skylight glass-panes. The bar of brass or bronze had a diameter of less than a centimetre, which translates to something like 0.05 mm on the model. However, the thinnest brass-coloured wire I could find had a diametre of 0.1 mm, so is slightly oversize. Recently I came across molybdenum wires that are readily available down to diametres of 0.02 mm ! It seems that they are used in the repair of mobile phones, to separate the front-glass from the LCD-display. I obtained a selection of sizes, but have not worked with the wires yet. The wires are supposed to be tough, so I do not know how easy it is to cut them to length.

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Spool of gold-coloured molybdenum wire

I tried various methods to construct the window-frames with exactly spaced out bar. In the first instance I tried to mill-out the frame from a thin piece of acrylic glass. Evenly spaced notches for the ‘bars’ were milled with a pointed engraving bit. However, I did not manage to get the edges and corners as crisp and clean as desired.

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Milling notches for window bars

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Placing wires as window bars

I then wanted to construct the frame near-prototype fashion. To this end I drilled holes for the 0.01 mm wires into the edges of 0.5 mm by 1.0 mm strips of styrene. It proved difficult, however, to align the four parts of the frame well enough.

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Drilling frame for protective bars

In the final version I welded 0.25 mm thick strips of styrene onto the milled acrylic glass body of the skylight. The block then was presented at the correct angle to an engraving cutter in the milling machine and the notches for the wires cut. In the next step the wires were glued into these notches, which was a major challenge – for the steadiness of my hand and my patience ...

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Built-up frames

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In situ milling of notches for wire bars

The frame was completed by another layer of 0.25 mm styrene strips. As the total thickness should have been only 0.4 mm, the excess was sanded off on the milling machine. Finally, the edges were trimmed to size and rounded with the draw-plate described above.

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Sanding frames to scale thickness

The officers' mess skylight will receive an outside protective grille on the basis of an etched part.

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Completed skylights for the pantry (left) and the officers’ mess (right)

To be continued ....

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PostPosted: Fri Dec 22, 2017 8:49 am 
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Very impressive result from considerable effort of precision
machining and very out-of- the quadrant thinking!

BRAVO ! or for the German speakers... :cool_2: Hut ab! chapeau!

Tschuess

Jim Baumann

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PostPosted: Sat Jan 06, 2018 6:00 pm 
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Thanks JIM :jump_1:

*********************

There are numerous ideas for constructing ladders or stairs for shipmodels. Together with gratings, this seems to be something that pre-occupies the the mind of shipmodellers. Perhaps because spacing saw-cuts evenly is a challenge with hand-tools. Having machines with tool-slides, controlled by spindles with graduated dials, at one’s disposal takes away most of that challenge, at least in theory. It seems logic to transpose the common techniques for making ladders just to a smaller scale, say with thinner saw-blades to cut slots into the spacing device.

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Preparing a spacing device for stairs

However, the sizes of the materials to be used in itself poses a challenge. Treads in (wooden) stairs are typically 25 to 30 mm thick, which translates to roughly 0.2 mm in the 1:160 scale. The stringers of stairs may be somewhere between 40 and 60 mm thick, which translates into 0.3 to 0.4 mm on the model. The treads are usually notched into the stringers, so that the outside of the sides are smooth. This is a technique that would be very difficult to reproduce at this small scale because milling notches 0.2 mm wide and 0.2 mm deep into material that may be as thin as 0.3 mm is practically quite difficult to do consistently. The other difficulty is to cut the treads to exactly the right lengths. This problem also appears, if one tried to simply butt the steps against the sides for glueing. The clean glueing, without fillets appearing, also was a challenge, at least for me.

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Cutting notches for treads into stair-stringers of bakelite-paper

Initially, the material of choice was bakelite-paper, which is very stiff, but rather brittle at a thickness of 0.2 mm and has attracted all the issues mentioned above. I then tried polystyrene, which is much less brittle, but also much less stiff. It has the advantage that it can be glued, or rather welded, using dichloromethane, allowing nearly invisible joints between close-fitting parts. While all these properties are useful, the styrene proved to be too flexible to be sanded to size on the milling machine, compared to the bakelite-paper.
After various trials the most promosing method for stairs that emerged was the following:

1. cut strips somewhat wider than the stringers of the stairs from 0.2 mm bakelite paper.
2. arrange these strips in a pack on the micro-vise; count as many strips as needed for the stairs, plus a few spares, and a couple of sacrificial/protective ones at each side of the pack.
3. push the strips down into the vise and then sand them as a pack to equal width.
4. incline the vise to the angle of the stairs and cut slots at the required distances with a fine-toothed saw-blade of 0.2 mm thickness.

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Cutting slots for steps into stair-stringers of polystyrene

5. cut strips slightly wider than the width of the treads from 0.2 mm bakelite-paper, clean them up and round one edge slightly.
6. cut the treads slightly longer than the final length from those strips.
7. take two stair-stringers and insert the treads, which should be a tight fit, with the rounded side first.
8. adjust one side so that it is straight and the steps are only protruding slightly – everything should be square, of course.

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Glueing together the stair components

9. infiltrate thin cyanoacrylate cement into the slots and let set thoroughly.
10. adjust the opposite side to the right distance and repeat as above.
11. nip-off excess tread material on the outside.
12. file the outside of the stringers flush with a diamond nail-file and/or the disc sander
13. glue a second layer of 0.2 mm bakelite paper to the outside of the stair-stringers

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Sanding to thickness the stairs

14. transfer to the vise on the milling machine, slots down, and sand down the stair-stringers to just above the steps.
15. turn the stairs over and sand them down to to the scale width of the stringers.
16. sand the stair-stringers to the required thickness.
17. clean-up all burrs etc.
18. the stairs are now ready to be trimmed to length.

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Selection of stairs (not yet trimmed to length)

I have tried to follow the same procedure with brass-sheet and soldering, but using bakelite-paper gave crisper results. Perhaps one should have etched the components and then soldered them together, as I had envisaged at the very beginning. This would have allowed to hold close tolerances of the individual parts, requiring less clean-up. However, I found setting up the etching process to onerous and also wanted to see, whether I could fabricate the stairs usind classical workshop techniques.
The hand-rails and other fittings will be produced later, together with the railings, as they will be very delicate.

To be continued ... soon ... first I have to go to Helsinki on business – and to have some Rudo-steak, now that Christmas is over :deadhorse:

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PostPosted: Sat Jan 06, 2018 6:54 pm 
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>>>.......using classical workshop techniques..........<<<

of which you have pretty complete mastery!

stunning result--

such breathtaking work.... , I cannot breathe....!

:thumbs_up_1: :thumbs_up_1: :thumbs_up_1:

JB

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http://www.modelshipgallery.com/gallery ... index.html

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PostPosted: Mon Jan 08, 2018 9:06 am 
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A most impressive ladder construction technique and flawlessly executed. I continue to be amazed by your fine scale machining skills. I wish I had half your ability!

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PostPosted: Mon Feb 05, 2018 4:47 pm 
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Thanks, gentlement, for your praise :big_grin:

***********************************************

I began to work now on the various ventilators. These are not of the usual form, but have rectangular cowl. I first drew a layout for the cowl in order to photo-etch them, but then thought the assembly of these two or three millimeter high cowls would be too fiddly.

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Images showing different types of ventilators on board of a WESPE-class gun-boat

As the ventilator-shaft would have to be turned anyway, I decided to machine the vents from the solid.

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Photo-etching mask for ventilator cowls

The first attempt was in Plexiglas, because it is easy to machine and the cover part from polystyrine foil could be easily cemented on without traces using dichloromethane. It turned out that at thin wall thickness required, Plexiglas would be too brittle and delicate.

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Setting up rectangular material in the 4-jaw-chuck

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Turning the ventilator shaft

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Drilling out the cowl

For the second attempt I used brass. While in the case of Plexiglas I began with a rectangular piece held appropriately in the independent 4-jaw-chuck, I started now with a round brass bar held in the excentric 2-jaw-chuck. If I did not have such an exotic chuck, I could have started off with a larger diamter brass bar and milled away the excess.

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Setting up a brass rod in an excentric 2-jaw chuck

As a first step the ventilator-shaft was turned to size, leaving also the two re-enforcement rings. The piece was then turned around and taken into a collet of the appropriate diameter to drill out the shaft to such a depth that the bottom would not be visible.

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Turning the re-enforcement rings

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Drilling out the cowls

To be continued soon ...

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PostPosted: Tue Feb 06, 2018 8:41 am 
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stunning craftmanship... very beautiful work...


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PostPosted: Tue Feb 06, 2018 4:58 pm 
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Thank you !

************

The nascent ventilator was then transfered to the micro-mill for further machining. The mill had been set-up with the dividing head carefully aligned with the milling spindle using a round piece of cemented carbide.

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Aligning the milling spindles

It was also fitted with the geared dividing attachment. The first machining step was to mill out the cowl, starting from the pre-drilled hole.

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Milling out the cowl

In the next step the sides were milled flat. Finally, the vertical back of the cowl was milled round using the geared dividing attachment.

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Round-milling the cowl back

The top curve was ground on free-hand using a diamond wheel on the micro-sanding machine. The top cover was fashioned from a piece of thin copper foil soldered on. The excess was milled off in the same set-up as previously.

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Shaping the back of the cowl on the grinder

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Soldering on the top of the cowl

The boiler-room ventilators are sitting on a base that is square and then tapers into the round of the shaft. This part was milled and turned from Plexiglas, so that it can be cemented to the boiler-room skylight.

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Finished ventilator and base

This base will be painted white together with the boiler-room skylight, while the ventilator itself will be painted buff. This separation into two parts will give a clean separation between the colours. By then I will also have to try to find out, whether the inside of the ventilators was red or buff.

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Boiler-room ventlators on the boiler-room skylight

The handles for turning the ventilators are still missing, but I will drill the respective holes on all ventilators in one go, so that I only need to set up the milling machine once for this.
There is a dozen more ventilators to come, all of them significantly smaller than these two.

To be continued soon ...

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PostPosted: Tue Feb 06, 2018 9:56 pm 
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I am so envious of your equipment and your skill! This is more entertaining than watching TV. I'm fascinated by watching a master at work, regardless of the task. Thank you so much for sharing this.

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PostPosted: Mon Feb 12, 2018 6:00 pm 
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Thanks for these kind words !!!

********************************

Work on the ventilators continued. The ventilators for the officers' mess, which included also a Venturi-suction ventilator, where produced in the same way, but are a lot smaller with the head only 2.9 mm high and the shaft having a diameter of 1.3 mm.

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Milling one of the ventilators for the officers’ mess

All ventilators would be taken down, when the 'battle ready' alarm would be given. To this end they are mounted on sockets that would be closed with a lid or plug. This socket was turned from Plexiglas and will be glued onto the deck. It will be painted black together with the deck, while the white ventilator with black interiors will be put into place at the final assembly of the model.

Image

Image

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Ventilators for the officers’ mess

To be continued soon ...

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