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PostPosted: Tue Aug 31, 2021 5:06 am 
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Hi all,

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Just a little project to the side: building a master for a resin cast rescue boat of the 'Eierland' class.
Thirteen of these boats were built between 1922 and 1968 to serve the smaller coastal locations of the Dutch Rescue Service KNZHRM. Several of these were on the Frisian Isles including Ameland. On that station in particular they used horse traction until August 1979, when an accident caused the carriage to slip into an unknown pit, drawing the eight horses into their drowning. In 1994 the last of these boats was decommisioned, but all thirteen survive 'til the present day, even one staging the launch on summer days with horse traction for the tourists. (but of course with many precautions not such an accident to happen again!)

The boat itself was designed in Denmark by Orlogsværfted in Copenhagen, as a slightly smaller version of the Skagen motor rescue boat. The thirteen Dutch boats were built by Taat bros. in Katwijk. As the screw (propeller) is mounted in a tunnel, the centre keel from midship aft is replaced by two parallel timbers. This also causes a little challenge to be reproduced in scale, the problem is to retain structural rigidity during the build.

Here first two images of the first phase: after making the central keel member plate, I made the floor decking plus the side boxes. To this I will fit the temporary curved top deck, which will serve to get the hull topsides in exactly the right position. When these are firm the central part will be removed, only the fore and aft decking will remain.

Next I will start building the tunnel to the floor. When this is firm and rigidly attached to the aft part, the hull sides will be added in strips, showing the clinker build structure.

Note: this little boat ca 6 inches long will appear as kit, including the carriage trailer and a Caterpillar D4 tractor (which was the most common power source, besides the horses).
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Last edited by Maarten Schönfeld on Sun Sep 05, 2021 3:02 am, edited 1 time in total.

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PostPosted: Tue Aug 31, 2021 7:05 am 
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Nice project! :thumbs_up_1:


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PostPosted: Fri Sep 03, 2021 12:01 pm 
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You are filling in the spaces between the bulkheads with a sandable foam material?

Cheers: Tom


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PostPosted: Fri Sep 03, 2021 2:32 pm 
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Fliger747 wrote:
You are filling in the spaces between the bulkheads with a sandable foam material?

Cheers: Tom
Hi Tom,

Almost that: balsa wood. Works like a charm, I have built masters for twenty years that way. I just started with the first pieces, I will post some photos tomorrow.

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Even now I see the foreign flag a-raising, their guns on fire as we sail into hell"
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PostPosted: Sat Sep 04, 2021 3:10 pm 
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I just spent a few hours adding the balsa filling and voilá:
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Now you can also clearly see the two heavy timbers constructing the screw tunnel, in effect replacing the keel over half the length of the ship. In particuler the connection to the stern must have required some good thinking, I have a feeling the clinker built skin took over quite some of the strains in fact. After all these boats were VERY sturdy: they all survived many decades of duty in heavy seas.

After a good check I may start the skinning tomorrow. As you see this built goes really quick! All the detailing will take the most time.

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Even now I see the foreign flag a-raising, their guns on fire as we sail into hell"
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PostPosted: Sun Sep 05, 2021 4:40 pm 
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Hi Maarten....

>>> ...Just a little project to the side ...<<<

heheh! is that not your version of Kryptonite...? :big_grin: :scratch: :rolf_3:

looking good so far!

JB

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PostPosted: Sun Sep 05, 2021 4:50 pm 
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Will be following this with interest. The German equivalents have been for a long time on my 'one-day-to-be-built' list ...

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PostPosted: Tue Sep 07, 2021 7:27 am 
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You might also buy Maarten's kit once it is ready. They rescued lots of Germans -:). I do hope the kit will have decals for all 13 of them. I have fond childhood memories of the Noordwijk boat, the Knut Karlsen. For the 7 year old me this was huge ship and I was delighted to be lifted aboard one at one of their open days. Only to be 'slightly' disappointed when my mum said I could not sail away on it and become a pirate...
wefalck wrote:
Will be following this with interest. The German equivalents have been for a long time on my 'one-day-to-be-built' list ...


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PostPosted: Tue Sep 07, 2021 8:38 am 
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Pieter wrote:
You might also buy Maarten's kit once it is ready. They rescued lots of Germans -:). I do hope the kit will have decals for all 13 of them. I have fond childhood memories of the Noordwijk boat, the Knut Karlsen. For the 7 year old me this was huge ship and I was delighted to be lifted aboard one at one of their open days. Only to be 'slightly' disappointed when my mum said I could not sail away on it and become a pirate...
wefalck wrote:
Will be following this with interest. The German equivalents have been for a long time on my 'one-day-to-be-built' list ...

Hi Pieter, nice to hear from you again! Everything's well with you?

Let me share you a little secret: this project has been on my bucket list for years, but I never found the required drawings. There is really very little publicly shared information on these boats. Until last year, when I just approached the 'Stichting Kurt Carlsen' in Noordwijk aan Zee, and Bingo! They were very willing to support my project and share the drawings they had. These proved more than sufficient to start this build, it only had to wait until I had finished several other projects (the O21 and O27 submarines for the Dutch Navy, and the Q.E.D., Anthony Fokker's personal Yacht. All kits, already available or just about to be launched).

Before I got the plans from the 'Kurt Carlsen', I had already found a longitudinal section of the original 'Eierland' in the 'Schip en Werf' magazine in 1924. There are slight differences of course with the later boats. What I will do is provide options: to build either the early 'Eierland' from 1922 (with a small petrol engine and even a set of oars!) or any of the later boats. I think there will remain some minor differences though that may be tackled by the individual model builder.

And I will definitely add decals for all the thirteen boats, even with their name changes: the 'Eierland' became 'De Bruine' in 1937 and 'Rietschoten' in 1968. Also all the applicable station names will be included, and the variety of 'NZHRM', 'KNZHRM' and 'KNRM' titles that were displayed on the fender over the decades. Of course also the colours changed over the lifetime, from light greyish blue in the 20-ies, to very dark blue in the thirties to sixties, and finally to the current light and bright blue, starting in the eighties. I will also include 'AMELAND' titles of course, as a courtesy to the public that have watched one of the summer demos staged on that island (with the 'Abraham Fock').

I will also provide the 'Van Leer' trailer with tracks, and a Caterpillar ca. 1947 D4 tractor: getting plans of the latter is really still a challenge, so if anyone can help with that one? Anyone who wants to build a launch dio can easily find horses from Italeri or Airfix in 1/72 scale. Napoleonic hussars abound!

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"I've heard there's a wicked war a-blazing, and the taste of war I know so very well
Even now I see the foreign flag a-raising, their guns on fire as we sail into hell"
Roger Whittaker


Last edited by Maarten Schönfeld on Tue Sep 07, 2021 9:25 am, edited 2 times in total.

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PostPosted: Tue Sep 07, 2021 8:50 am 
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wefalck wrote:
Will be following this with interest. The German equivalents have been for a long time on my 'one-day-to-be-built' list ...

Hi Wefalck,

Pieter is joking, but it's pretty true. Quite some German leisure sailers have come into trouble on the Dutch shores, and were rescued by the KNZHRM/KNRM. As you are quite familiar in the Netherlands (as I know), you will surely be aware of that.

But you mention the German equivalent: can you maybe share what boat that would be? I only found this page: https://www.ndr.de/geschichte/chronologie/Vom-Ruderboot-zum-Seenotkreuzer,seenotrettung362.html

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Even now I see the foreign flag a-raising, their guns on fire as we sail into hell"
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PostPosted: Tue Sep 07, 2021 11:30 am 
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Maarten, I was wondering, whether the 'Reddningsmuseum' in Den Helder wouldn't have had any plans. As far as I remember from my only visit back in 2008 or so they have three 'real' boats in their collection, one of them afloat.

The German rescue organisation is the Deutsche Gesellschaft zur Rettung Schiffbrüchiger (DGzRS) founded in 1865 in Bremen. Their current Web-site is: https://www.seenotretter.de/en/.

They used to have plans for their more recent boats that could be obtained through the Web-site. Over the last 150 years they used a wide variety of types of boats, starting with rowing and sailing ones. The type of boats depended and depends on the environments in which they are meant to operate. There are special boats for the Wadden Sea and boats that are to be launched from the beaches of the Baltic, etc. Some of the types are similar to the Dutch ones and others were inspired by the British Life-Boat Association.

I am mainly interested in the early rowing and sailing ones and perhaps the very early motorised ones. The rowing ones are interesting, as they are built using the so-called Francis-system, i.e. from hydraulically shaped steel panels - looking from the outside like clinker-built boats. The launching carriages were originally drawn by a team of eight and later by tracked tractors built by Lanz. At least three of the boats are preserved (one in the Maritime Museum Bremerhaven, the others in their original sheds around the country). There is also one of the early sailing boats in the museum in Bremerhaven. Plans for the rowing boats and carriages are in Pâris' 'Souvenirs' and I have numerous pictures of a couple of boats in the museums.

Well, I gather the German boats also rescued quite a few Dutch, who got into trouble ...

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PostPosted: Wed Sep 08, 2021 7:51 am 
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wefalck wrote:
Maarten, I was wondering, whether the 'Reddningsmuseum' in Den Helder wouldn't have had any plans. As far as I remember from my only visit back in 2008 or so they have three 'real' boats in their collection, one of them afloat.

The German rescue organisation is the Deutsche Gesellschaft zur Rettung Schiffbrüchiger (DGzRS) founded in 1865 in Bremen. Their current Web-site is: https://www.seenotretter.de/en/.

They used to have plans for their more recent boats that could be obtained through the Web-site. Over the last 150 years they used a wide variety of types of boats, starting with rowing and sailing ones. The type of boats depended and depends on the environments in which they are meant to operate. There are special boats for the Wadden Sea and boats that are to be launched from the beaches of the Baltic, etc. Some of the types are similar to the Dutch ones and others were inspired by the British Life-Boat Association.

I am mainly interested in the early rowing and sailing ones and perhaps the very early motorised ones. The rowing ones are interesting, as they are built using the so-called Francis-system, i.e. from hydraulically shaped steel panels - looking from the outside like clinker-built boats. The launching carriages were originally drawn by a team of eight and later by tracked tractors built by Lanz. At least three of the boats are preserved (one in the Maritime Museum Bremerhaven, the others in their original sheds around the country). There is also one of the early sailing boats in the museum in Bremerhaven. Plans for the rowing boats and carriages are in Pâris' 'Souvenirs' and I have numerous pictures of a couple of boats in the museums.

Well, I gather the German boats also rescued quite a few Dutch, who got into trouble ...

Hi Wefalck,

Yes, I assume that will be equally true of course! And the DGzRS is an equally respectable organisation. I think it is quite fortunate Revell took effort to create a number of kits of DGzRS boats. But as these are only of recent and current types, it would by equally nice to see some of the older historical types, as you mention the rowing and sailing types from the later 19th and earlier 20th centuries.

It's also nice to compare: whilst the German DGzRS focused mainly on larger "Rescue cruisers" (Rettungskreuzer), and the British RNLI on larger boats with displacement hulls, whilst on the other hand the Dutch KNRM have now fully focused on RHIBs providing great speed in the first place. It's my intention to provide also one, maybe two of the latter in kitform. The smallest of these, the Valentijn class, will provide nice comparison to the new German Verena, now in use as the new satellite boat (Tochterboot) of some of the larger cruisers. In the Netherlands, these Valentijn boats are used as trailer launched beach rescue boats, just as their predecessors from the Eierland class.

My chum Jaap Woort had checked with the Reddingsmuseum indeed, but they provided him only with the plan of the welded steel boats from the President Steyn class, telling him these were having the same hull plan. Well, they are close and even based on the wooden boats, but their dimensions are different and the details are even further divers. Six of these steel boats were built in the late thirties and early forties, but these were not very satisfactory and all were decommisioned by 1960, and replaced -- by new wooden boats of the old design!

So I am very happy I could get this plan from the 'Stichting Kurt Carlsen', enabling my project.

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"I've heard there's a wicked war a-blazing, and the taste of war I know so very well
Even now I see the foreign flag a-raising, their guns on fire as we sail into hell"
Roger Whittaker


Last edited by Maarten Schönfeld on Wed Sep 08, 2021 10:01 am, edited 1 time in total.

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PostPosted: Wed Sep 08, 2021 8:35 am 
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Some of these early and later boats for operation in shallow, tidal waters have interesting hull designs with 'screw-tunnels' to protect the screws in shallow water and against pieces of wreckage.

While enjoying my weekend afternoons on the beach of Egmont-aan-Zee during my stay in Alkmaar, I have seen the Egmont lifeboat being brought to the water or hauled out several times. They used a heavy tracked Caterpillar tractor and a modern version of the slip-trailer. The tractor actually went quite deep into the water, if I remember correctly: https://egmond.nl/oefening-kijken-van-knrm-egmond/

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PostPosted: Wed Sep 08, 2021 10:15 am 
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wefalck wrote:
Some of these early and later boats for operation in shallow, tidal waters have interesting hull designs with 'screw-tunnels' to protect the screws in shallow water and against pieces of wreckage.

While enjoying my weekend afternoons on the beach of Egmont-aan-Zee during my stay in Alkmaar, I have seen the Egmont lifeboat being brought to the water or hauled out several times. They used a heavy tracked Caterpillar tractor and a modern version of the slip-trailer. The tractor actually went quite deep into the water, if I remember correctly: https://egmond.nl/oefening-kijken-van-knrm-egmond/

Yes indeed! These Eierland class boats had just such a 'screw-tunnel', constructed by two wooden timbers, partly instead of the central keel. These also served as the engine bearers. The predecessor of the Valentijn class boat you showed was the 'Ubbo' on the Egmond station, now in the Reddingsmuseum in Den Helder. https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:De_UBBO_in_het_Nationaal_Reddingmuseum_Dorus_Rijkers_(01).JPG

Below you see how I'm building the clinker hull, using strips cut from an Evergreen 'clapboard' sheet. The strips are 2mm wide, which is slightly too much so I file the surplus away before applying the next strip. The advantage is that the strips are bevelled already, as it is quite difficult to bevel straight plastic strips yourself. Note: I temporarily put a square rod 6.3 x 6.3 into the screw tunnel to keep it in shape while the glue is setting.
Attachment:
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Even now I see the foreign flag a-raising, their guns on fire as we sail into hell"
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PostPosted: Wed Sep 08, 2021 4:44 pm 
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:thumbs_up_1: :thumbs_up_1: :thumbs_up_1:

that is a very worthy project!

so many ships and boats-- so little time

This true story is still one to inspire the dogged spirit of volunteer life savers at sea of all nations

https://rnli.org/about-us/our-history/t ... rlock-weir


JIM B

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PostPosted: Thu Sep 09, 2021 12:58 am 
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JIM BAUMANN wrote:
:thumbs_up_1: :thumbs_up_1: :thumbs_up_1:

that is a very worthy project!

so many ships and boats-- so little time

This true story is still one to inspire the dogged spirit of volunteer life savers at sea of all nations

https://rnli.org/about-us/our-history/t ... rlock-weir


JIM B

Thanks Jim!

That's a very touching and inspiring story! I hadn't heard that one yet. I happen to know the place though, I spent a three weeks holiday in 2002 in a cottage, just a couple of miles east of Porlock Weir, in Woodcombe near Minehead. I did quite some hiking there, beautiful area and impressive rugged coastline. I can easily visualise the toil endured by the men dragging the lifeboat from Lynmouth over the hills, at night in foul weather...

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PostPosted: Thu Sep 09, 2021 11:18 am 
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Just finished the skin of the boat, pretty satisfied with it. Need to clean it up, correct and repair some blemishes.

Then on to the detailing.
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Even now I see the foreign flag a-raising, their guns on fire as we sail into hell"
Roger Whittaker


Last edited by Maarten Schönfeld on Thu Sep 09, 2021 12:10 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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PostPosted: Thu Sep 09, 2021 11:32 am 
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It's very successful, not easy the clinker boats! :cool_1:

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PostPosted: Thu Sep 09, 2021 12:11 pm 
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Exactly! Requires a bit of ingenuity, as didn't build it with flat planks, but beveled ones instead. The greatest challenge is finding how the planks need to be tapered towards their ends, in this case from 2mm down to 1.5mm. I needed to built several planks first to see how much taper was required.

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PostPosted: Sat Sep 11, 2021 7:03 am 
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It's starting to look like a boat!

I further detailed the screw tunnel:
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An then on to the inside: the bulkheads, the topside of the fore and aft peak, the mooring bitts.
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Even now I see the foreign flag a-raising, their guns on fire as we sail into hell"
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