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PostPosted: Wed Sep 01, 2010 2:50 pm 
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Capitão Norbert wrote:
Hi Bernd
wonderfull details on hull.
i like the method you using to do it.
great skilling
p.s. do you do your hull from fiberglass?? or wood? in some pictures appear what i think fiberglass
:thumbs_up_1:


Hi,

used wood on frames, covered inside and outside with glass fiber and epoxy resin. You have to use glass fiber in- and outside because wood will work and create cracks ans seems over time. Planks 4 mm thick + 1 mm oaf glass fiber. Frames 6 mm thick, I used only high quality wood consisting of several layers. You need a motor tool to cut ist as it is rather hard to cut with a jig saw.

Bye now,

Bernd.

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PostPosted: Wed Sep 01, 2010 2:52 pm 
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Hi Bernd Always good to redirect the focus to another part of the build . Helps to widen the scope of the build and avoids attention fatigue. Superb work .
Dave Wooley :thumbs_up_1: :thumbs_up_1: :thumbs_up_1: :thumbs_up_1: :wave_1:


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PostPosted: Wed Sep 01, 2010 3:38 pm 
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hum i was considering use 4mm to my planking cause the wood is marine plywood from Cedar.
but i think this was so much thick for it and i stoped it.
so after a time i found a 2mm wood to do it but the difference of price is very considerable. and the 2mm(1.40x0.70meters) i need 2 plates and increase the cost
and 4mm one plate of 2.20x1.60meters is sufficient and is from Ceddar :thinking: the 2mm is high quality than the marine plywwod. what wood do you use please?
thanks by explain it


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PostPosted: Thu Sep 02, 2010 4:29 am 
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Hi,

I used 4mm birch plywood. I had it cut at a local carpenter into stripes of 5 mm and 10 mm. I used the 5 mm stripes in aerea of tight curves, e.g. stern, bow. The 10 mm stripes were used in the midship area. I always work symetrically - appliying 2 planks on the left and on the right at the same time to avoid distortions.

Bye! :wave_1:

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PostPosted: Thu Sep 02, 2010 5:59 am 
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Norbert - can you please send me your email address - I´ll send you then some further info! :wave_1:

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PostPosted: Thu Sep 02, 2010 8:20 am 
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ok i will sending you
thanks :thumbs_up_1:


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PostPosted: Thu Sep 02, 2010 8:23 am 
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norberto.pontes@tugare.com.br :thumbs_up_1:
or eldemolidor@hotmail.com


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PostPosted: Thu Sep 02, 2010 8:56 pm 
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Bernd,

Ran into this Blog surfing....ton of construction pics. Look down the right side of site. Links to other blogs with tons of photos from just about every category. Hope it helps.

Keep up the awesome work, this is a great follow!

http://anonymous-generaltopics.blogspot ... l/Bismarck

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T



"The humblest craft that floats makes its appeal to a seaman by the faithfulness of her life."

Joseph Conrad


USS Arizona
USS Laffey
U-69


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PostPosted: Fri Sep 03, 2010 6:21 am 
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Hi!

Thanks a lot for that link! :thumbs_up_1:

Bye!

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PostPosted: Sat Sep 04, 2010 1:23 am 
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Bernd,

The Oklahoma City was a Cleveland class light cruiser. Shell plating thickness ranged from 1/4 inch (6.35 mm) to 7/8 inch (22.2 mm), not very different from the Bismark. However, the bottom center keel plating was as much as 1.6 inches (42 mm) thick. The thinest plates were at bow and stern at the main deck level.

As on the Bismark the plating thickness within a strake was increased in steps, usually by 1/16 inch (1.5 mm). However, the strake overlap pattern was very complex.

I have posted some details of the Cleveland class hull plating here:

http://www.okieboat.com/CAD%20hull.html

Phil

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PostPosted: Sun Sep 05, 2010 10:14 am 
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Phil,

you did great PC work on the hull. I am thinking about how to do the weld seams on my hull... maybe I´ll use some thin styrene threads and acetone...?!

Bye now - time for the cinema ... :smallsmile:

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PostPosted: Sun Sep 05, 2010 10:50 am 
....


Last edited by ingura on Sun Oct 31, 2010 6:16 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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PostPosted: Sun Sep 05, 2010 7:39 pm 
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Archer Fine Transfers produces rivets and weld beads that are resin beads and lines on decal paper. Apply them like decals, finish with decal setting solution and paint. These were mostly created for model railroad and armored vehicles.

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PostPosted: Mon Sep 06, 2010 9:37 am 
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Hi ingura and Phil,

I consider both methods and will make some tests. Decal paper has an edge which could be visable under a coat of paint ... have you tested them already, please? Masing tape could work, I think 15 mm is a likely width for weld lines on a hull - what do you tink?

Bye now,
Bernd.

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PostPosted: Mon Sep 06, 2010 12:32 pm 
...


Last edited by ingura on Sun Oct 31, 2010 6:14 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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PostPosted: Mon Sep 06, 2010 1:05 pm 
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Hi,

I am still not sure to do them or not... will need some testing. On the other hand they are clearly visiable on the hull ...

Bye for now!

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PostPosted: Mon Sep 06, 2010 3:05 pm 
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109,

I confess I haven't tested the decal rivets - I have the same reservations about the decal edge that you have. However, I have seen model railroad cars with decals that have no visible edges. The trick (I am told) is using the correct decal setting solution. This essentially desolves the decal in place, causing it to flow nicely into cracks, louvers, etc, and feathering the decal edge so it is not noticeable. A coat of paint over the decal helps hide the edge.

I have tried this with less than perfect results. I can still see the decal edges, but the decals do conform well to the uneven surfaces. I still have some learning to do to get it perfect.

I plan to try the rivet decals to get rivets in the plating on a turret.

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PostPosted: Tue Sep 07, 2010 7:34 am 
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Hi Phil,

on http://www.scalehardware.com/ you can find miniature rivets made from brass or stainless steel ...

I added a few pictures of yesterday´s work ...

Bye for now,

Bernd.


Attachments:
File comment: After sanding I added a coat of primer which laps onto the styrene strip
Taylor_01.JPG
Taylor_01.JPG [ 75.57 KiB | Viewed 1785 times ]
File comment: Final wet sanding (800 grid) and fine tuning.
Taylor_02.JPG
Taylor_02.JPG [ 94.89 KiB | Viewed 1785 times ]
File comment: Final wet sanding (800 grid) and fine tuning.
Taylor_03.JPG
Taylor_03.JPG [ 49.97 KiB | Viewed 1785 times ]
File comment: After a hard days work: Saltimbocca alla 109er... rabbit liver, parma bacon and a sage leaf wrapped in meat... yummy :-)
MahlzeitJPG.JPG
MahlzeitJPG.JPG [ 59.97 KiB | Viewed 1785 times ]

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PostPosted: Wed Sep 08, 2010 12:11 am 
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Bernd,

I have looked at the Scale Hardware rivets. At 1:96 the rivets I need would be about 0.010" (0.25 mm), and there are lots of them! I really don't want to try to hand drill thousands of .010" holes - those tiny drill bits snap very easy (I speak from experience). There isn't any obvious way to position the hull under the milling machine.

One place I really want rivets is at the edge of the main deck - very visible. The hull plating extended above the deck and there was an "L" strip with four rows of rivets to join the deck to the hull plating. The rivets were almost flush on the outside of the hull, but the rivets on this strip in the waterways are very visible in photos. At 1:96 this strip would be 0.05" thick (0.127 mm) and 0.100" (2.5 mm) wide. I have considered photoetching to remove some metal and leave the rivets. Another possibility is creating a multi-row ponce wheel for flat sheet, followed by a bending jig to form the angle.

On the outside of the hull the seams between hull plates above the waterline amidships were covered by exterior backing plates, with five or six rows of rivets. There will be only 2-3 mm wide, and would be excellent candidates for the decal rivets. Since the plates have a sharp edge the decal edges would not be visible. Unfortunately, the decal rivets are too large scale. Again, I may use photoetch or a ponce wheel. These rivets were almost flush and don't show in most photos, so maybe I will leave them off.

I am following your build to see how you do some of these things. Good work so far!

Phil

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PostPosted: Wed Sep 08, 2010 1:29 am 
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Bernd,

Another question - do you know anything about the Bismark plans in the U.S. National Archives? After WWII several German and Japanese ship plans were captured and taken back to the US for study. The Archives list plans for the Bismark and Tirpitz, but the list doesn't say what plans are there.

Phil

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