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PostPosted: Sun Apr 12, 2020 3:02 pm 
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I've used it to "tack" P E railing in place on 1/700 ships. then go back and final glue it with formula 500 glue. I just put a little puddle of the UV glue on my glass plate work surface, dip the edge of the P E in the puddle in a few places ( depending on how long the piece is) hold it in place with a tweezers ant one spot, usually the middle and hit it with the light. Then move to the next spot and do the same and so on. I get the rail in exactly the position I want every time.

Works for me.

EJ

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" 1/700Hasegawa 45
" 1/700Dragon 44
" 1/700Trumpeter 43
" 1/540Revell vintage 62
" 1/350Trumpeter 42
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PostPosted: Mon Apr 13, 2020 7:06 am 
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Thanks for the info. What kind of glue is formula 500? Some brand of cyano? Or pva one? I am from Spain and we have different names here for similar products.


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PostPosted: Mon Apr 13, 2020 8:05 am 
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It is a PVA marketed for canopy install.

Image

Image



EJ

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" 1/700Hasegawa 45
" 1/700Dragon 44
" 1/700Trumpeter 43
" 1/540Revell vintage 62
" 1/350Trumpeter 42
Fair Winds and Following Seas


Last edited by MM2CVS9 on Mon Apr 13, 2020 9:56 am, edited 1 time in total.

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PostPosted: Mon Apr 13, 2020 8:35 am 
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Location: Westminster, Colorado
I just started using Bondic UV glue for my rigging lines. Very simple to use. I put a small working amount of the glue on a piece of tape. The glue stays usable for a long time unless it's exposed to the included UV light. I places a tiny amount of glue with a toothpick where I want the line to connect. I place a tiny amount on the line I'm connecting. Hold it in place with tweezers and then hit it for five seconds with the UV light. Job done. Perfect butt joints and no loose ends to try and trim off. So far I have only used it on lycra rigging lines. I would think it would work well with metal also.

The method I used prior to this is with CA glue. Similar approach. I put a tiny drop of CA where I want the line to attach. I dip the end of the line in CA accelerator or apply with a micro brush. Next I touch the wetted line to the CA glue and hold it there for about five seconds. The accelerator sets off the glue and the line stays in place. When I do this with wire I apply a tiny amount of CA glue on the end of the wire and let it dry off. That gives the CA something to bite to. Then I place the glue on the ship where I want the line to go to, apply accelerator to the line. Bring the two together and hold for about five seconds and the line is secure. The down side to this method and is that sometimes you get a misfire. The accelerator takes a long while to go off before you can apply glue to it again. Like 30 min to an hour. So don't try applying the CA to a locations or attach point where it's been exposed to accelerator until the accelerator has fully gone off.

That's why I switched to the UV glue. If I have a failure (which hasn't happened yet) I can go right back in and do it over. No down time.

I can't speak to other brands. But the Bondic does have good viscosity for what we do with our rigging lines.

Good luck
Dave


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PostPosted: Mon Apr 13, 2020 9:17 am 
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Thankyou to both of you for your answers. I will try it.


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PostPosted: Mon Apr 13, 2020 9:57 am 
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I don't know why those pictures are so big. Never had that happen before.

EJ

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" 1/700Hasegawa 45
" 1/700Dragon 44
" 1/700Trumpeter 43
" 1/540Revell vintage 62
" 1/350Trumpeter 42
Fair Winds and Following Seas


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PostPosted: Mon Apr 13, 2020 10:26 am 
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Location: Westminster, Colorado
MM2CVS9 wrote:
I don't know why those pictures are so big. Never had that happen before.

EJ


It was a big idea! :thumbs_up_1:

All kidding aside, how does this compare to Micro Kristal Klear? Or is it pretty much the same thing?

Thanks!
Dave


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PostPosted: Mon Apr 13, 2020 10:51 am 
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Don't know, I've never seen the stuff.
I have used Gator's glue. Works well. Also just Elmers White glue and Aileen's Tacky Glue. I think the're all about the same thing, maybe a slightly different formula.

EJ

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" 1/700Hasegawa 45
" 1/700Dragon 44
" 1/700Trumpeter 43
" 1/540Revell vintage 62
" 1/350Trumpeter 42
Fair Winds and Following Seas


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PostPosted: Mon Aug 24, 2020 9:28 pm 
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Location: South Carolina
I've been using Ultrafine Lycra rigging again. My first breakthrough was learning to use it directly from the spool. This keeps one end of the line from going where you don't expect it. This is a great way to do rigging runs, where you anchor the free end to a mast or spar (a loop or two and some superglue) and start unspooling the Lycra to the next point in the rigging plan (you have to let the first end glue dry), anchor it there, and unspool from there to the next point, and so on until you dead end (no place left to go) where you finally anchor it and cut it from the spool.

Today, I was doing a rigging to rigging connection (German battleship Scharnhorst; there are lines dropping from the rigging between the spars that stick out from near the top of the bridge). I can't neatly do this with either nylon monofilament or ultrafine wire, because they won't loop tightly enough around the line I'm tie-ing them to. I've never been able to tie knots in Ultrafine rigging when I try this, although it pulls tight enough. In today's case, the horizontal rigging line I put in between the bridge spars was 0.003" nylon monofilament (not stretchy, so I could tie to it without deforming it). I looped Lycra around the starboard nylon run a couple times with the free end from the Lycra spool and anchored it with superglue. I took the spool and ran the line under the foremast platform and over to the opposite side where I wanted to anchor the second end to the portside nylon monofilament (symmetrical rigging scheme). To make loops now, however, I had to cut the Lycra from the spool (the spool is way too big to fit between the nylon run and the bridge).

I was worried that I wouldn't be able to work with the free end of the Lycra, because it likes to curl up and do other crazy things when it's not under any tension. What I discovered today was that I could take a very small square of Tamiya yellow masking tape and stick the end of the Lycra to it. I then used needle nosed tweezers to loop the Lycra around the nylon monofilament by guiding the little piece of masking tape with the tweezers. This was much easier than trying to work directly with the Lycra with the tweezers (it likes to get away at the most inconvenient times from the tweezers). So I wanted to pass this tip along to those who work with Ultrafine Lycra rigging.


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PostPosted: Sun Sep 13, 2020 11:21 am 
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I have not tried to rig my WW2 and WW1 warship models, but I think I should give it a try. I've looked at some online videos to get a better handle on what to do and as a result, I've decided that stretched sprue is just too fragile. I think some sort of filament is the best route to go, but I'd like to get recommendations on which products you experts use for rigging line.

Thanks in advance for any advice you can give....


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PostPosted: Sun Sep 13, 2020 6:08 pm 
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Location: Calgary, AB/Surrey, B.C., Canada
There are generally two types of rigging product: stretchy and non-stretchy. Stretchy (like the Lycra in this thread) gives you taut rigging at the risk of uneven thickness (the more you stretch, the thinner it gets) and increased stress on your masts and yards (especially problematic if they're just PE pieces). Non-stretchy (like UNI Caenis fly-tying line) requires you to either attach them while they're pulled taut or the application of heat (such as from incense) afterwards to tighten them.

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PostPosted: Sun Sep 13, 2020 9:51 pm 
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Location: South Carolina
rfwood1 wrote:
I have not tried to rig my WW2 and WW1 warship models, but I think I should give it a try. I've looked at some online videos to get a better handle on what to do and as a result, I've decided that stretched sprue is just too fragile. I think some sort of filament is the best route to go, but I'd like to get recommendations on which products you experts use for rigging line.

Thanks in advance for any advice you can give....


I would add to Timmy C's "stretchy" and "non-stretchy", that there is also "soft" and "hard". Soft would be like a piece of string or sewing thread, tending to deform under gravity (sag, if you will, toward the ground), while "hard" tends to be stiff and largely non-bending (and non-stretchy). Stretched sprue and ultrafine wire are used for rigging and are of the "hard" variety. These don't lend themselves to knots or loops, so they have to be cut exactly to length and attached (for example with super glue) on each end of the rigging run. There are advantages and disadvantages to each type, and I have used multiple types on a single ship rigging scheme to take advantage of different aspects of the various types.

DavidK


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PostPosted: Tue Sep 15, 2020 5:52 pm 
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Thanx for the tips and opinions. I've ordered some Lycra and I'll see how that works and go from that point.


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