The Ship Model Forum

The Ship Modelers Source
It is currently Sat Oct 20, 2018 1:49 am

All times are UTC - 6 hours [ DST ]




Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 113 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6  Next
Author Message
PostPosted: Sat Mar 18, 2017 9:29 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Tue Sep 25, 2012 8:11 am
Posts: 444
Location: Elyria, Ohio USA
This information may be posted in this thread somewhere but I couldn't find it. (technology challenged at times)
What was her armament at the time of her loss? Did she still have all the 1.1's or were some replaced with twin or quad 40 mm's? Were her .50's replaced with 20 mm mounts? I am going to be working on a build of her soon and I wanted to do her right at the time of loss. Any help would be appreciated. Thanks, Mike.

_________________
Just finished:
1/350 USS Samuel B Roberts FRAM I 1966

Current projects:
1/700 USS Baltimore late 1943
1/350 HMS Hood 1941


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
PostPosted: Mon Mar 20, 2017 12:09 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Mon Aug 06, 2007 6:29 pm
Posts: 1733
Like Enterprise, placing the intended quad 40MM in the same locations as the 1.1's would have caused #3 mount to interfere with the crane. (That is why Hornet was built with the original #3 location vacant and the mount further aft, while Enterprise copied Hornet's arrangement when 40MM were actually installed.) But Wasp required all additions to balance, port and starboard, to allow her to use all her limited fuel and not need permanent "ballast" to keep her level. The expected extra weight of the 40MM was probably why her new tub was added on the port side instead of further aft to starboard. However, at the time of her last refit, the new 40MM were unavailable so she sailed to Guadalcanal with the original 4 quad 1.1's in their original locations, and had a big empty tub to port. She never again entered a shipyard to have this changed. As for the light AA, she had a full compliment of 20MM guns, but retained some .50's. You will need to find a diagram to sort them all out.


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
PostPosted: Mon Mar 20, 2017 2:57 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Tue Sep 25, 2012 8:11 am
Posts: 444
Location: Elyria, Ohio USA
Dick, that is what I thought but couldn't find anything to confirm it. Thanks a bunch for the info!

_________________
Just finished:
1/350 USS Samuel B Roberts FRAM I 1966

Current projects:
1/700 USS Baltimore late 1943
1/350 HMS Hood 1941


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
PostPosted: Wed Jul 12, 2017 1:20 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Tue Jan 11, 2005 1:40 pm
Posts: 6406
Location: In the hills of North Jersey
Nice photo of Wasp, pre-war. Date and location unknown. It looks like there are Vindicators on the deck, and **maybe** (??) Northrop BT-1s aft of the Vindicators? I can't really tell. Photo courtesy of Fred Branyan, who got it via a friend, who got it from a WW2 vets personal photo album.
Attachment:
WaspCV7.jpg
WaspCV7.jpg [ 508.01 KiB | Viewed 879 times ]

_________________
Martin

"Tomorrow is the most important thing in life. Comes into us at midnight very clean. It's perfect when it arrives and it puts itself in our hands. It hopes we've learned something from yesterday." John Wayne

Ship Model Gallery


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
PostPosted: Thu Dec 14, 2017 6:06 pm 
Offline

Joined: Tue Jun 16, 2009 1:49 pm
Posts: 209
Photos of Wasp on Operation Calendar shows the Spitfires lined up for take off and a number of Wildcats behind the island, on the starboard side of the ship. Placing Aosima's model aircraft on the deck of their Wasp, it seems that the Wildcats would interfere with the Spitfire's takeoff if the Spitfires took off along the centreline. which is what I would expect. I can see three possible answers to this problem:
1. The Spitfires took off to the starboard side of the carrier. I doubt this.
2. The model aircraft are oversized. (I know that the ship is slightly under-scale.)
3. The Wildcats were sitting with their tails run out on outriggers. I know this was done on British carriers from 1942 onwards, but I don't know whether it was being done on US carriers at this time, at least.

The real answer may be something else altogether, of course. Does anyone know?


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
PostPosted: Thu Dec 14, 2017 7:52 pm 
Offline

Joined: Sat Jul 05, 2014 1:27 pm
Posts: 68
Location: Caumont-sur-Durance, France
The images I've seen of Spitfires launching during Operation Calendar clearly show them taking off along the flight deck centreline. The corresponding images of the Spitfires ranged prior to take off shows them spotted in a pattern similar to that commonly used on US carriers at that time. Wasp's F4F's had wings folded and the shots also show them parked facing fore-and-aft on the extreme starboard side, which means they took up very little deck width. Their spot does not interfere with normal take off runs.

Maurice


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
PostPosted: Thu Dec 14, 2017 8:01 pm 
Offline

Joined: Sat Jan 17, 2009 2:12 pm
Posts: 1918
how many wildcats shown in the pictures?
"Wasp carried twelve Wildcats during the two aircraft ferrying missions she carried out with the Royal Navy to augment the dwindling defenses of Malta (Operation Calender, in April, and Operation Bowery, in May 1942)"
http://www.navsource.org/archives/02/020727.jpg
http://www.navsource.org/archives/02/07.htm


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
PostPosted: Fri Dec 15, 2017 12:50 am 
Offline

Joined: Mon Jan 10, 2005 11:02 am
Posts: 9629
Location: EG48
Graham Boak wrote:
3. The Wildcats were sitting with their tails run out on outriggers. I know this was done on British carriers from 1942 onwards, but I don't know whether it was being done on US carriers at this time, at least.


US Carriers had outriggers, but there was typically at most one per "quadrant." I don't know Wasp's complement but know that the numbers varied during the war. Essex class carriers maxed out at three, for example, before the Navy started removing them to use the weight for other things.

_________________
Tracy White -Researcher@Large

"Let the evidence guide the research. Do not have a preconceived agenda which will only distort the result."
-Barbara Tuchman


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
PostPosted: Sun Dec 17, 2017 1:06 pm 
Offline

Joined: Tue Jun 16, 2009 1:49 pm
Posts: 209
Thanks, particularly to Maurice. This means I have to make up more Wildcats beyond the four with extended wings I've already made, but this time with folded wings. So maybe it won't be finished this year, given other commitments. I was thinking of doing a couple more as Martlets, anyway.

Fortunately the kit does provide lost of markings for the USN types, if a very odd selection in type and number for the Spitfires.

My understanding was that the use of outriggers to run the aircraft's tailwheel outboard was invented on HMS Indomitable, date unknown for sure but not thought (by me) to be before 1942. Indomitable was in the Indian Ocean when Wasp was assisting the UK.


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
PostPosted: Sun Dec 17, 2017 1:47 pm 
Offline

Joined: Mon Jan 10, 2005 11:02 am
Posts: 9629
Location: EG48
It was most certainly pre-war, as this photo on CV-4 Ranger (from here) demonstrates.

_________________
Tracy White -Researcher@Large

"Let the evidence guide the research. Do not have a preconceived agenda which will only distort the result."
-Barbara Tuchman


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
PostPosted: Sun Dec 17, 2017 4:41 pm 
Offline

Joined: Tue Jun 16, 2009 1:49 pm
Posts: 209
Thanks, that's clearly the same principle if somewhat over-engineered compared to what I understand the British examples to have been, They seem to have been a simple channel pivoted outboard with the tailwheel running into it. I dare say it was rather more complicated in reality than that appears.


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
PostPosted: Mon Dec 18, 2017 6:56 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Wed Jan 13, 2010 9:10 am
Posts: 2408
Location: san francisco
Almost done.


Attachments:
2017-02-19%2011_47_02.jpg
2017-02-19%2011_47_02.jpg [ 210.19 KiB | Viewed 495 times ]
Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
PostPosted: Wed Sep 26, 2018 11:39 am 
Offline

Joined: Tue Jan 06, 2015 5:28 pm
Posts: 27
I have never seen a photo of WASP CV-7 in Measure 4 but after looking through some reels on the Critical Past website, I think I found one. The reel states as from early 1941, which would be about right. Any thoughts?
Image


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
PostPosted: Wed Sep 26, 2018 12:34 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Mon May 21, 2007 5:49 pm
Posts: 1162
Location: Troutdale, OR
Image didn’t load, would love to see as I have been searching as well.

Matt

_________________
In the yards right now:
1/350 USS Portland CA-33 1942
1/350 Trumpeter Texas with a twist


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
PostPosted: Wed Sep 26, 2018 1:00 pm 
Offline

Joined: Mon Jan 10, 2005 11:02 am
Posts: 9629
Location: EG48
Charybdis wrote:
Any thoughts?


Looks dark. Could be 5-D as well.

_________________
Tracy White -Researcher@Large

"Let the evidence guide the research. Do not have a preconceived agenda which will only distort the result."
-Barbara Tuchman


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
PostPosted: Wed Sep 26, 2018 11:36 pm 
Offline

Joined: Tue Jan 06, 2015 5:28 pm
Posts: 27
Quote:
Could be 5-D as well.


According to http://www.shipcamouflage.com/usn_cv.htm the ship was painted in Measure 4 which had "Black Formula #82" applied to vertical surfaces and Dark Grey (5-D) to horizontal surfaces. There are photos of WASP in Iceland in Oct 41 which show her in M12 (unmodified!) and Based at GITMO in Oct 40 with Standard Navy Grey. She only had this measure a short while.


Here are links to some screen shots in case anyone can't see the image.
https://www.dropbox.com/s/wnurn3ff7t90nsl/Early%201941.jpg?dl=0
https://www.dropbox.com/s/jy592i27huzcwsb/Early%201941b.jpg?dl=0


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
PostPosted: Thu Sep 27, 2018 8:31 am 
Offline

Joined: Mon Jan 10, 2005 11:02 am
Posts: 9629
Location: EG48
5-D when freshly applied was about as dark as black though, so this is another case where I don't think we can determine color from a black & white photo.

_________________
Tracy White -Researcher@Large

"Let the evidence guide the research. Do not have a preconceived agenda which will only distort the result."
-Barbara Tuchman


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
PostPosted: Tue Oct 02, 2018 11:04 pm 
Offline

Joined: Tue Oct 02, 2018 10:13 pm
Posts: 1
I'm just getting back into the hobby and I'm finding my self building a lot of aircraft carriers in 1/700 I picked up the Wasp about a month ago, I really enjoyed building this ship. I do agree with what other members have said about the light AA guns seam to be to big but overall this was a fun build. the attached photo shows Wasp in the foreground (about 90% complete) Yorktown in the middle (about 50% complete) and Graf Zeppelin on top ( only about 20% done)
Image


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
PostPosted: Wed Oct 03, 2018 8:31 am 
Offline

Joined: Mon Jan 10, 2005 11:02 am
Posts: 9629
Location: EG48
Welcome back and welcome aboard!

_________________
Tracy White -Researcher@Large

"Let the evidence guide the research. Do not have a preconceived agenda which will only distort the result."
-Barbara Tuchman


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
PostPosted: Wed Oct 03, 2018 11:23 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Wed Jan 13, 2010 9:10 am
Posts: 2408
Location: san francisco
:thumbs_up_1: :thumbs_up_1: :thumbs_up_1: Welcome Back!!!


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 113 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6  Next

All times are UTC - 6 hours [ DST ]


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 6 guests


You can post new topics in this forum
You can reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
Powered by phpBB® Forum Software © phpBB Group