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PostPosted: Mon Oct 01, 2018 11:25 pm 
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What color were the life rafts and net floats during wwii? Were they haze gray?

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PostPosted: Mon Oct 01, 2018 11:33 pm 
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bigjimslade wrote:
Much has been written criticizing (and praising) the Iowa class's protection. E.g.:


In regard to the Anatomy of the Ship, I just got the new Bismarck one, so I have both the Conway and Osprey versions. The New Osprey version (different author) relies heavily on 3d graphics which are totally absent from the Conway version. At times I wonder of these graphics are distracting because they often seem to be pretty pictures, rather than explanations of the anatomy of the ship.


The CG graphics in the new Iowa book from the series is by Stefan Draminski. I have several books from his Super Drawings In 3D series, including battleship Missouri and Iowa. His work is generally very good and very good looking, but not perfect. He clearly research some areas of the ship more exhaustively than others, so many areas have accurate rendering of hidden and obscure details. But other more mundane areas may look right at first glance, but comparison with readily obtained photos show errors that reflect inattention to detail.

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PostPosted: Tue Oct 02, 2018 12:58 am 
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From some photos I have seen, the rafts generally matched the color of the adjacent part of the ship they were attached to. This is notable with particular camouflage schemes where photos have shown for instance a color boundary continuing right over the rafts just as they might for instance a gun tub or bulwark.

This is not definitive but something I have seen instances of.


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PostPosted: Tue Oct 02, 2018 6:14 pm 
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chuck wrote:
bigjimslade wrote:
Much has been written criticizing (and praising) the Iowa class's protection. E.g.:

The CG graphics in the new Iowa book from the series is by Stefan Draminski. I have several books from his Super Drawings In 3D series, including battleship Missouri and Iowa. His work is generally very good and very good looking, but not perfect. He clearly research some areas of the ship more exhaustively than others, so many areas have accurate rendering of hidden and obscure details. But other more mundane areas may look right at first glance, but comparison with readily obtained photos show errors that reflect inattention to detail.


The problem is that creating an accurate 3D model of a ship would take a life time. It seems to me less detailed 3d model showing structural details would be of more use to this kind of crowd than a 3d model that is supposed to be photographic.


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PostPosted: Wed Oct 03, 2018 2:29 am 
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bigjimslade wrote:
The problem is that creating an accurate 3D model of a ship would take a life time. It seems to me less detailed 3d model showing structural details would be of more use to this kind of crowd than a 3d model that is supposed to be photographic.



If you have the original you can scan it... modern warships are actually scanned to that it's easier to make replacement parts to fit

Image


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PostPosted: Wed Oct 03, 2018 12:53 pm 
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EJFoeth wrote:
bigjimslade wrote:
The problem is that creating an accurate 3D model of a ship would take a life time. It seems to me less detailed 3d model showing structural details would be of more use to this kind of crowd than a 3d model that is supposed to be photographic.



If you have the original you can scan it... modern warships are actually scanned to that it's easier to make replacement parts to fit

Image


But try to scan the Bismarck. :-)


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PostPosted: Sat Oct 06, 2018 9:13 am 
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The plans collection on the New Jersey is currently randomized. There can be anything in any given box. Most of the material is pretty dry, like wiring diagrams for things than cannot be identified. You have to sort though a lot of dirt to find a gem. Here is one.

It's a plan for the Wellin screw opening on the breach of the 16" guns.

Attachment:
002 Lo Res.jpg
002 Lo Res.jpg [ 87.85 KiB | Viewed 453 times ]


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PostPosted: Sat Oct 06, 2018 11:03 pm 
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Some serious large scale precision machine work in making those! There were good reasons why the main armament of a Battleship required such a long lead time. There were various production bottlenecks in all out war production. Amongst them were drafting! Another was such precision machine work, especially the cutting of reduction gears for steam turbine drive. As a result numerous merchant type hulls were equipped with the direct drive three cylinder uniflow piston steam plants and DE's equipped with either diesel or turbo electric drive. Imagine the equipment for cutting rifling for a 50+ ft barrel!


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PostPosted: Fri Oct 12, 2018 9:25 pm 
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Does anyone have drawings or photos showing the sizes of the navigation lamps on WWII US battleships? I am trying to make the lights for the 1/200 Missouri by cutting sections of clear plastic rods. I need to know how large these lamps were.

I had considered using altar-small LEDs, but there is no way to run the leads to the LEDs up the mast without ruining the accuracy. So they will not light up.

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PostPosted: Sat Oct 13, 2018 3:37 am 
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Chuck, check on flea bay in toys & hobbies for SMD (Surface Mount Diode) Leds. These are available in very small sizes, I think #402 is the smallest. This size is smaller then a pin head They are numbered according to size and are available in Bright white, warm white, red, green, yellow and blue - covers most of our modelling needs. The really good part for scale ships is they come with the wires soldered on and the wire is ultra thin and insulated with a very tough material. The wire is something like .003" thick. When buying get the ones with red and black wire as they are the thinnest wire. I just had a look and they are available 20 leds for under $10 Australian.With the wire being so small they could be run down a mast and be almost invisible.


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PostPosted: Sat Oct 13, 2018 5:54 am 
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The use of such lights in wartime would be quite limited, though I have a USN WWII key (from my dad) that was used to send morse code via the masthead light...

.003 wire is pretty tiny!


Last edited by Fliger747 on Sat Oct 13, 2018 9:34 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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PostPosted: Sat Oct 13, 2018 9:15 pm 
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I just measured the wire with my electronic calipers. It should be .24MM not thousandths.
Sorry about that.
BUT it is still very thin wire and could easily be hidden in plain sight on a model boat.


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PostPosted: Sat Oct 13, 2018 9:35 pm 
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That works out to about 2" in scale, no too bad!


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PostPosted: Mon Oct 15, 2018 1:24 pm 
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BB63Missouri wrote:
Chuck, check on flea bay in toys & hobbies for SMD (Surface Mount Diode) Leds. These are available in very small sizes, I think #402 is the smallest. This size is smaller then a pin head They are numbered according to size and are available in Bright white, warm white, red, green, yellow and blue - covers most of our modelling needs. The really good part for scale ships is they come with the wires soldered on and the wire is ultra thin and insulated with a very tough material. The wire is something like .003" thick. When buying get the ones with red and black wire as they are the thinnest wire. I just had a look and they are available 20 leds for under $10 Australian.With the wire being so small they could be run down a mast and be almost invisible.




Thank you. After reading your message, I found a German ebay store vendor called LED Baron. He seems to have the entire assortment of pinhead LEDs. The leads on the LEDs are apparently very thin magnetic metal wire painted with an insulating paint. Does anyone know if the insulating paint will last if used with crazy glue or overpainted with enamel paint?

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PostPosted: Tue Oct 16, 2018 11:59 am 
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chuck wrote:
Does anyone have drawings or photos showing the sizes of the navigation lamps on WWII US battleships? I am trying to make the lights for the 1/200 Missouri by cutting sections of clear plastic rods. I need to know how large these lamps were.


I know I have come across these on the ufilm at NARA. I'll keep an eye out for the plans as I go through the boxes.


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PostPosted: Tue Oct 16, 2018 8:48 pm 
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I believe you are referring to the "truck lights" on the mast? My recollection is that the Red and Green (Port and Starboard) lights are mounted on the exterior of the navigation bridge wings. Somewhere I have photos onboard Missouri that show these, but being in the middle of Siberia at the moment... On my eye pad I do have a photo detailing the forward mast arrangements of North Carolina, labeling all sorts of small items. In this photo the truck lights as labeled are on a small horizontal extension aft the mast, near the top and are (WAG) a little larger than a mans head as an assembly. Below this and similar in appearance (-10') is the "man Overboard and Breakdown light".


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PostPosted: Tue Oct 16, 2018 9:59 pm 
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I annotated that photo back in 2014 -- curiously my name is no longer on the image attached. ;)

It was labeled based on lighting plans available on the Researcher@Large website as well as notations in the Floating Drydock plans of BB-55, but may not be 100% accurate. For instance I still have no idea what COLOR the "man overboard & breakdown lights" are, or what color the truck lights would be. The purpose of towing and anchor lights seem obvious but I've never found a source that describes their exact use or specific color. Any info from the gents in this thread on this would be great.


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PostPosted: Tue Oct 16, 2018 11:02 pm 
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The annotations are quite useful, though I didn't build this ship, it is a good description of typical gear aloft on a modern ship of that era. I don't remember where I found this image, there was no attribution attached when I saw it.

Thank you for your work on this!


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PostPosted: Wed Oct 17, 2018 12:07 am 
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Here some interesting info from HMCS Haida: http://www.jproc.ca/rrp/rrp2/visual_lights.html

Looks as if the breakdown and truck light being vertical, were used together to indicate a breakdown and flashing if for man overboard.


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PostPosted: Wed Oct 17, 2018 3:38 am 
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I found this site http://navyadministration.tpub.com/1406 ... hts-36.htm

It has some helpful information as to the colour and position of lights. It may be of use. Just keep following to the next or previous page for what you are looking for.


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