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PostPosted: Wed Apr 01, 2020 12:28 pm 
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I have not found any photographs of the Iowa class propeller shafts. Here is one of CV-67. It is very similar to that of the Iowa class. One difference is that the Iowa class has 14 bolt hole compared to 12 here. Another difference is that there are more thickness variations for bearings on the Iowa class.

Most of the Iowa class segments are 48' long. The longest is 64'. The shortest is 45'-3 3/4"


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 Post subject: Trivia
PostPosted: Fri Apr 03, 2020 1:35 pm 
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The hatches on 16-inch turrets 1 and 3 swing down and towards the front face of the turret.
The hatches on turret 2 swing to the rear of the turret.


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PostPosted: Fri Apr 03, 2020 6:45 pm 
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In the picture showing the shafts, there is also the bearing blocks.
Way cool to see those

James


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 Post subject: Re: Trivia
PostPosted: Fri Apr 03, 2020 9:33 pm 
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bigjimslade wrote:
The hatches on 16-inch turrets 1 and 3 swing down and towards the front face of the turret.
The hatches on turret 2 swing to the rear of the turret.


Turret 2 also were built with a catwalk under the hatch so if the crew had to evacuate through the hatch when the turret is trained to one side, they won’t break their legs falling a full deck. I wonder if the hatch swings to the rear to allow the crew to crawl forward on the cat walk So they can reach the foot rails around the barbette and then shimmy to the 01 deck or down by the ladder on the barbette.

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PostPosted: Sun Apr 05, 2020 12:48 pm 
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Here's Turret No. 2 on the NJ. The main hatch and the platform below have been removed and moved forward. The hinges are in place and painted yellow. The emergency hatch remains in place.

The hatch on Turret No. 1 does not block visitor access to it remains in place.

Attachment:
Turret Hatch.jpg
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Turret Hatch.jpg
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PostPosted: Mon Apr 06, 2020 1:20 pm 
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Here's a drawing I did of the roller bearing assembly. This sits on top of the fixed turret support. The revolving part of the turret sits on this. This revolves when the turret revolves but more slowly.

The surfaces of the bearings are cones The bearings are in groups of six. However, they are not evenly spaced within the groups and the groups have different spacings. The lack of an even spacing was supposed to reduce wear.
Attachment:
Roller Bearings.jpg
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PostPosted: Thu Apr 09, 2020 3:53 pm 
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bigjimslade wrote:
Here's a drawing I did of the roller bearing assembly. This sits on top of the fixed turret support. The revolving part of the turret sits on this. This revolves when the turret revolves but more slowly.

The surfaces of the bearings are cones The bearings are in groups of six. However, they are not evenly spaced within the groups and the groups have different spacings. The lack of an even spacing was supposed to reduce wear.
Attachment:
Roller Bearings.jpg


I think uneven spacing makes it unlikely that if the ship is subjected to shock damage and bearing impress dents into the race, the bearing will then get caught in the dents at multiple angles of train.

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PostPosted: Fri Apr 10, 2020 11:18 pm 
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chuck wrote:
I think uneven spacing makes it unlikely that if the ship is subjected to shock damage and bearing impress dents into the race, the bearing will then get caught in the dents at multiple angles of train.


That's a good theory.

Here are some more details I have found scouring the blueprints. This photo is from the National Archives and can be found all over the internet so you get get it at much higher resolution. It shows the gun in the process of being fired. The yoke at the end is pulled back from the slide so some of the barrel is exposed in the gap. A cylinder at the bottom absorbs the recoil. There is 48" of travel in the cylinder so recoil is less than that (I have seen values between 43" and 48" in print). If the gun recoils 48.0000001" there will be damage. The two cylinders above push the gun forward.

My reason for posting is at the forward end. Just to the left of the side there is a vertical plate. That plate is attached to the turret and runs down to below the gun and as the side of the gas seal (ie keeping out poison gas). Running perpendicular to that plate you can see two plates forming a triangle . They are linked to each other, to the turret roof, and to the slide with hinged. They are the top of the gas seal. When the gun moves down, upper plate moves down so that it is slightly forward of vertical. When the gun moves up, the hinges bend to form a smaller angle between the seal plates.

At the sides and bottom the seal is formed with blades. There is a curved plate mounted under the gun for the seal. In higher resolution, you can see the wear on the vertical plate forming the seal.

I have not measured it out but it looks like they could not use a simple curved plate at the top it would have blocked the gun from moving close to horizontal.

Attachment:
Slide.jpg
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PostPosted: Tue Apr 14, 2020 1:16 pm 
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This is an excerpt from plan 7201ZF describing cover plates over the gun girders in the turrets.

The reason I share this is to show that the plans indicated differences among the ships. This is one of the earliest plans (10/31/39) and the last modification is 2/7/40 (nearly five months before the Iowa was laid down). I cannot discern from the changes whether the BB-61/62—BB-63/64 distinction was a change or an original.

These are just minor differences in the placement of stiffeners. It is puzzling to me why there would be a difference.

Attachment:
Turret Plan.jpg
Turret Plan.jpg [ 145.87 KiB | Viewed 1796 times ]


I have a picture I took of this area. There is less than 4 feet between the decks in this area. With the stiffeners above, the crouch space is even less.This is looking aft in Turret 2. The powder hoist to the right gun is to the left of the opening. That is the sloped bulkhead at the left of the plan. The ladder rungs in the background lead to the center gun pit. The opening in the background leads to a void area. There is a bolted plate that leads from there to the right gun pit. I came up an opening behind that leads to the pan plate. It is a maze of twisty passages.
Attachment:
P1040761 Turret 2 platform above pan level at center gun.jpg
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PostPosted: Tue Apr 14, 2020 7:57 pm 
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Which kit, when paired with an aftermarket resin or 3d printed enclosed round bridge, would be the best fit for a 1943-1945 NJ. The Blue Ridge NJ represents the Korean War fit, not WWII.

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PostPosted: Thu Apr 16, 2020 1:14 am 
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drdoom1337 wrote:
Which kit, when paired with an aftermarket resin or 3d printed enclosed round bridge, would be the best fit for a 1943-1945 NJ. The Blue Ridge NJ represents the Korean War fit, not WWII.

What scale?


Also, found this recent video from World of Warships

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3BdhDBvuHW4

going through turrets 1 and 2 of the New Jersey. It's too bad they skip so it's probably hard to follow if you have not explored this area yourself. The video goes into the same space that I shared a picture of previously.

In case you do want to follow along:

The video starts in the lower projectile flat of Turret No. 2 that is open for tours (and is clean). He climbs into the upper flat (that is not open for tours and is covered in grease). He goes upwards followoing the area between the center and right guns and comes out in the center gun pit.

Then he goes back down to the upper projectile flat (with some skipping). You can seem him climbing down to the lower projectile flat. The video skips to the main deck.

He then climbs into Turret 1 and goes into the right gun pit. Then the video skips to him coming into the upper projectile flat of turret 1. He climbs down to the lower flat. Then he climbs down the ladder on the central column into the powder handling flat.

He then proceeds to the powder magazine for Turret 1. This is on the Turret 2 tour. So things are this point are nice and neat. The Turret 1 magazine is on used on the tour because it is larger than the ones for Turret 2.

He goes from the magazine into the powder handling flat of Turret 2. The stairs shown are additions for the tour. He heads for the stairs then the video jumps to the lower projectile ring of Turret 2 (this is a balcony above the powder flat that is only present in this turret).

The he climbs the stairs added for the tour to the lower projectile flat (so he is back where the video started). He exits the turret through the opening cut at the third deck for the tour. He heads aft and the video ends at the third deck in the access trunk that opens next to the XO stateroom, just outside the wardroom on the main deck.


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PostPosted: Fri Apr 17, 2020 10:41 pm 
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I'd like to go with 1/350. I already have the 1/700 Tamiya Iowa and the 3d NJ round bridge. 1/200 scale seems too long for this class. The only 1/200 kit I own (am working on) is the Mikasa. I will probably purchase the Nelson or Rodney but even those are around 42" long.

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PostPosted: Thu Apr 23, 2020 12:45 am 
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I don't think there are a lot of choices. Tamiya Missouri could probably be redone as a NJ with add ons. Model Monkey has a bridge conversion.


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PostPosted: Sat Apr 25, 2020 10:39 am 
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The Tamiya Missouri is easy to build, but the kit is old, and contain relatively obvious and difficult to correct inaccuracies in hull shape and proportion of superstructure and main turrets. Very Fire Iowa class kits came on the market in the last year or two. They are harder to build than tamiya but much more accurate.

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PostPosted: Wed Apr 29, 2020 1:31 am 
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Haven't read through this whole thread so this may have already been posted, but if not..............some 3D eye candy for you Iowa fans.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IN09Tf0i3PI

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A review of the situation at about 1100 was not encouraging.” Capt. Gordon, HMS Exeter. 1 March 1942


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PostPosted: Wed Apr 29, 2020 6:34 am 
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bigjimslade wrote:
Here's a drawing I did of the roller bearing assembly. This sits on top of the fixed turret support. The revolving part of the turret sits on this. This revolves when the turret revolves but more slowly.

The surfaces of the bearings are cones The bearings are in groups of six. However, they are not evenly spaced within the groups and the groups have different spacings. The lack of an even spacing was supposed to reduce wear.
Attachment:
The attachment Roller Bearings.jpg is no longer available


While from a much smaller turret (5.25" from HMS Prince of Wales), the below shows similar roller bearings from below as it were, that is here the 'ring' lays upside down on the sea floor.


Attachments:
Roller-Bearings.jpg
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We are off to look for trouble. I expect we shall find it.” Capt. Tennant, HMS Repulse. 8 December 1941
A review of the situation at about 1100 was not encouraging.” Capt. Gordon, HMS Exeter. 1 March 1942
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 Post subject: Rangefinder Hoods
PostPosted: Sun May 10, 2020 12:55 am 
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Here is an area that a lot of plans get wrong: the rangefinder hoods. For some reason they are usually depicted as having a straight front and back. If they were cast that way, there would have been no way to fit them into the mounting plate. In fact, the front and back turn normal to the center line at different points.

The drawings here are idealized. Because of vagarities of casting the hoods show a lot of variation and deviation from the planned ideal.

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PostPosted: Sun May 10, 2020 10:32 am 
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The side range find hoods on many battleships are in fact fan shaped like on the Iowa. This is because the range finder inside can all traverse a few degrees to either side of the center line of the turret to enable the range finder to track the target while the turret itself aim to lead the target. So the hood is fan shaped to accommodate the relative movements of the ends of the range finder.

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PostPosted: Mon May 11, 2020 3:33 pm 
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The hoods are not fan shaped---at least not at the base. They go straight out for a while (different amounts on front and back) then fan out.

If they were not straight at the end, they would not fit in the opening.

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PostPosted: Mon May 11, 2020 6:03 pm 
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Here's the real thing:

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