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PostPosted: Thu Aug 16, 2007 4:51 pm 
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So, there I was, rummaging through the boxes of pictures at NARA in College Park, MD, when I found a treasure trove of shipyard facility construction pictures (I have a thing for Graving Docks, you see).

One of the pictures of the brand-new drydock at San Juan Naval Air Station in Puerto Rico was documenting a crane-tipping incident at the brand-new dock.

Within the picture is a mighty-fine looking four-piper, which seems to me an Omaha-class CL.

Image

The picture is dated 17 November 1941.

Any guesses who the ship in the background might be? I have my guess, and if I'm right, you're seeing the culmination of a pretty interesting nautical tale of adventure at sea.

Here's a blow-up of the ship in question:

Image

Any correct reply earns the inquisitor a free beer or fruity soft drink... :big_grin:

Any takers?

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Last edited by AndrexP on Thu Jan 29, 2015 6:50 pm, edited 2 times in total.

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PostPosted: Thu Aug 16, 2007 6:28 pm 
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WAG: Omaha herself after the Oldenwald incident?

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PostPosted: Thu Aug 16, 2007 7:09 pm 
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DANFS wrote:
Just prior to the U. S. entry into World War II, on 6 November 1941, while on neutrality patrol with SOMERS (DD-381) in mid-Atlantic near the Equator, OMAHA sighted a vessel which aroused much suspicion by her actions.

Refusing to satisfactorily identify herself, and taking evasive actions, the stranger was ordered to heave to. She flew the American flag and carried the name WILLMOTO of Philadelphia on her stern.

As OMAHA's crew dispatched a boarding party, the freighter's crew took to life boats and hoisted a signal which indicated that the ship was sinking. When the OMAHA party pulled alongside, they could hear explosions from
within the hull, while one of the fleeing crewmen shouted "This is a German ship and she is sinking." In short order the men of the OMAHA, in spite of extreme dangers, had salvaged the vessel, rendered her safe and had her underway for Puerto Rico. The freighter, as it turned out, was the German ship ODENWALD, and her capture was one of the great
dramas of American seamanship.

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PostPosted: Fri Aug 17, 2007 4:29 pm 
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OMAHA was my guess, too.

I wasn't familiar with the Odenwald incident, but it seems like a great nautical adventure!

Here's one telling that I condensed from several sources:

Just prior to the U.S. entry into World War II on November 6, 1941, while on neutrality patrol with USS SOMERS (DD–381) in the mid-Atlantic near the Equator (00°40'N, 28°04'W), OMAHA came across a darkened ship that acted suspiciously when challenged. She flew the American flag and carried the name Willmoto of Philadelphia on her stern, but she refused to satisfactorily identify herself, and aroused suspicion by taking evasive action. The stranger was ordered to heave to, and OMAHA prepared a boarding party.

As the OMAHA crew dispatched the boarding team and approached the stranger, the freighter’s crew took to lifeboats and hoisted a signal which indicated that the ship was sinking. When the party pulled alongside they could hear explosions from within the hull, while one of the fleeing crewmen shouted "This is a German ship and she is sinking!"

The cruiser's SOCs and her accompanying destroyer screened the operation while the salvage crew -- despite extreme danger -- secured the vessel and rendered her safe. Joined by a diesel engine specialist from SOMERS, they soon had the raider underway.

Image USS OMAHA (CL-4), in right center, standing by the German blockade runner Odenwald, which has a U.S. boarding party on board, in the South Atlantic, 6 November 1941. Photographed from USS SOMERS (DD-381).

The ship proved to be the German blockade runner Odenwald, bound for Germany with 3,857 metric tons of raw rubber in her holds. Her capture was one of the great dramas of American seamanship.

The three ships proceeded to Trinidad to avoid possible complications with the Brazilian government if they returned to their base at Recife, Brazil. Because the American ships were nearing the end of a 3,023-mile neutrality patrol, fuel became an issue. Somers's crew ingeniously rigged a sail that cut fuel consumption sufficiently to allow her to reach her destination with fuel to spare.

Odenwald was escorted to San Juan, Puerto Rico by the two warships and delivered to U.S. authorities. The picture below shows OMAHA tied up at N.A.S. San Juan on November 17, 1941.

Image USS OMAHA (CL-4) in San Juan delivering the captured German blockade runner ODENWALD

The Odenwald capture is reportedly the last time that the US Navy awarded prize money to their crews as a result of a capture at sea.

[url=http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Image:Omaha_crew.jpg]Image Crewmembers of USS Omaha (CL-4) pose with U.S. and German flags, on board the captured German blockade runner Odenwald, in the South Atlantic. Life rings are present bearing the names Odenwald of Hamburg, and Willmoto of Philadelphia. The German ship had attempted to disguise herself as the Willmoto, an American-flag merchant steamer. Odenwald was captured by Omaha and USS SOMERS (DD-381) on 6 November 1941. This photograph is dated 18 November 1941.
[/url]

And now you know… the rest of the story…

(Just in case you wondered…)

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PostPosted: Fri Aug 17, 2007 11:57 pm 
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Does anyone have any photographs of Omahas in Ms 12 mod? I have Cincinnati (P/S) and Milwaukee (S only), but for Omaha (and Milwaukee also) herself, I only have superstructure end photos. Are there any others that wore Ms 12 mod? Can anyone help?

Thanks!

Don Andrews
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http://www.theandrewsshipyard.com


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PostPosted: Tue Feb 05, 2008 5:23 pm 
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Per http://www.shipcamouflage.com/usn_cl.htm, the answer is no other Omaha's carried MS12 Mod.


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PostPosted: Tue Sep 23, 2008 11:51 am 
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Location: Atlanta, GA (hometown: Milwaukee)
The Ship camo site says that Milwaukee only was painted in Ms12, but I have some refs that say it was the splotchy Ms12mod. any help? I'm building the ship right now and don't want to go further if I'm wrong.

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PostPosted: Tue Sep 23, 2008 1:21 pm 
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There is a picture on her Navsource page of her in Ms12mod. It's picture number #19-N-27088, the 12th picture down.

Are you building the Niko kit?

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PostPosted: Tue Sep 23, 2008 1:42 pm 
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Yes, it is the niko kit. So far the kit's a dream. Easy construction etc... It is my first resin ship.
I've had some trouble with the colors though. I posted in the main forum about how ocean grey seems too dark to me. (i'm using the pollyscale 5-O) When I look at the niko box it is almost a blue color. Most people have agreed that the box is probably the product of lighting issues, as ocean grey is darker than it appears there.

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PostPosted: Wed Sep 24, 2008 10:56 am 
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Who makes a kit of Omaha in her mid '30s fit? My grandfather served as an ensign on her from '33 to '35, and I would like to build her.


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PostPosted: Tue Oct 14, 2008 12:02 pm 
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As I mentioned above, I am building the Niko models U.S.S. Milwaukee and I am falling in love with this ship! I think it is one of the more distinct cruisers ever created. The kit itself is also incredible. It is the first Resin ship I've ever built and it is hardly different than a styrene kit in it's ease of construction. :thumbs_up_1:
a few questions:
How is the Corsair Armada U.S.S. Detroit? I think it's later War, as opposed to the early war config of the Milwaukee Kit.

Secondly, does anyone have pics of the Milwaukee's rigging in 1942? I haven't been able to get a good pic anywhere, I may have to just rig it for effect instead of true accuracy. (which is what I generally do anyway.)

Thanks
Chris

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PostPosted: Wed Oct 15, 2008 5:03 am 
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model_citizen wrote:
As I mentioned above, I am building the Niko models U.S.S. Milwaukee and I am falling in love with this ship! I think it is one of the more distinct cruisers ever created. The kit itself is also incredible. It is the first Resin ship I've ever built and it is hardly different than a styrene kit in it's ease of construction. :thumbs_up_1:
a few questions:
How is the Corsair Armada U.S.S. Detroit? I think it's later War, as opposed to the early war config of the Milwaukee Kit.

Secondly, does anyone have pics of the Milwaukee's rigging in 1942? I haven't been able to get a good pic anywhere, I may have to just rig it for effect instead of true accuracy. (which is what I generally do anyway.)

Thanks
Chris


The Corsair Armada kit is late war - I have been thinking of doing a conversion to USS MARBLEHEAD; perhaps the Niko Models kit would be better for such an endevour?

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PostPosted: Wed Oct 15, 2008 12:13 pm 
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I'd imagine the Niko kit is better for that (I plan to backdate her to the 30ties myself), since at least all the upper casemate guns are still all accounted for. The upper ones were removed during the war to accomodate for more AA. It's the casemates that make her worthwile, IMHO.

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PostPosted: Mon Nov 10, 2008 4:55 pm 
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I had to sand the third funnel's base quite a bit for it to fit in its place. My biggest complaint with the kit is how the main gun barrels look. I have actually put my kit on hold (not too much left to do) as I am waiting for some 6in barrels w/blast bags that I am going to try and modify.
all in all, I stress that this has been a delight to build... very few problems.

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PostPosted: Fri Nov 21, 2008 3:47 pm 
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I am about to start the rather frightening process of cutting out the barrels from my main turrets, which are the worst flaw of this kit I think. I bought some of the 6 in. metal barrels with blast bags from voyager models. These are intended for destroyers, but I think with a little effort they will fit nicely.
Here goes nothing.
BTW, You're kit is looking great so far Michel!
I'm keeping mine as the 1941 version, but you are right that it looks quite nice with those remaining earlier casemates.
Good luck and have fun.
I am watching with great interest.
I have a terrible camera, so I am trying to get a friend to photo my kit for the gallery eventually.

Chris

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PostPosted: Fri Nov 21, 2008 4:36 pm 
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Here is closer look at the main gun barrels on Richmond, circa 1943:
Attachment:
File comment: Richmond at Mare Island, 1943
richmond.jpg
richmond.jpg [ 106.61 KiB | Viewed 4135 times ]


Picture is from the NHC, via Navsource

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"Tomorrow is the most important thing in life. Comes into us at midnight very clean. It's perfect when it arrives and it puts itself in our hands. It hopes we've learned something from yesterday." John Wayne

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PostPosted: Fri Nov 21, 2008 4:50 pm 
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that's a terrific pic. I think it's odd how close together the barrels are, you don't see that too much.

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PostPosted: Mon Dec 01, 2008 2:23 pm 
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Michel's build of a Pre-war Omaha-class can now be found here

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"Tomorrow is the most important thing in life. Comes into us at midnight very clean. It's perfect when it arrives and it puts itself in our hands. It hopes we've learned something from yesterday." John Wayne

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PostPosted: Mon Jul 20, 2009 11:16 am 
All,

New to this site so pardon any errors made

Please note the back end of Marbelhead in this reverse image pic. Taken in Java after bomb damage. Is this an attempt to give the appearence of a shortened hull?

Mac D.
http://www.history.navy.mil/photos/images/g230000/g237439.jpg


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PostPosted: Tue Jul 21, 2009 1:18 pm 
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Mac D. wrote:
All,

New to this site so pardon any errors made

Please note the back end of Marbelhead in this reverse image pic. Taken in Java after bomb damage. Is this an attempt to give the appearence of a shortened hull?

Mac D.
http://www.history.navy.mil/photos/images/g230000/g237439.jpg


Welcome aboard, Mac:

The MARBLEHEAD received major damage to her aft hull from Japanese attacks. She was unable to use her port propellers at all, but was able to limp to Ceylon for temporary repairs, then to Madagascar and finally all the back to the U.S. (Boston) where she received a major overhaul. She was one of the few ships of the USN Asiatic Fleet to survive the actions around Borneo and Java in early 1942. Her story is one of the most courageous and inspiring episodes of the time.


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