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 Post subject: Italeri 1/35 Vosper MTB
PostPosted: Mon Feb 06, 2012 8:40 pm 
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Joined: Wed Apr 18, 2007 8:47 am
Posts: 22
Location: St. Charles, IL
WHAT THE KIT REPRESENTS AND WHAT BOATS CAN BE MODELED

I eagerly awaited Italeri ‘s release of a British World War II Vosper MTB in 1/35 scale. These boats have long been a favorite of mine, and the only plastic kit that was available was the woeful 1/72 (?) Revell offering from the 1960’s. (Whatever the box might say, that kit did not represent a Royal Navy Vosper at all. It was a model of the fictional “PT-73” from the television series, “McHale’s Navy”. The boat used in the show, ex-PT-694, was part of a lend-lease order built specifically for the USSR. All Vospers built in the US for British service were built to the company’s design, but these boats were built to a design produced by the USN and Annapolis Yacht Yard. Their configuration was very different. None served with the British. Aside from not being what it claims to be, the kit is rather crudely molded, out of scale, and the hull completely fails to capture the lines of the prototype.)

Over 300 Vosper MTBs were produced for the Royal Navy from 1938-44. They were ordered in batches, allocated on the basis of annual funding for naval construction. Generally referred to as “70 footers”, to the casual observer they all look much alike, but the firm continually sought to improve upon their original design and there are considerable differences between series. References often use incorrect terminology to distinguish between them and most are riddled with errors.

The kit is based on MTB 77, a boat from the 1940 Admiralty Programme. This was an excellent choice on Italeri’s part, as this particular design was utilized for the majority of the wartime programmes. Thus the kit provides a basis for the largest possible number of individual boats.

For the 1940 Programme, contract CP/8E/45096/40 was placed with Vosper on 14 April 1940 for 26 MTBs (73-98). The boats were built to General Arrangement Drawing No.9859. The hull was depicted in Drawing No. 9116. This was 71 ft- ½ in long, with a maximum beam of 19ft-3in. (Other series used hulls with different dimensions. While all the boats are collectively referred to as “70 footers”, this is only a colloquialism. Many sources quote the length for this particular series as 72 ft-6 in. That number includes the fitting of 18 inch cavitation plates. No hulls were built to that length.) The fuel system was revised in this series, with the tanks being divided fore and aft of the engine spaces. Earlier boats had all the fuel tanks located forward. This internal change was reflected in subtle changes to the layout of the main deck, resulting in minor repositioning of the armament from that of previous boats -more will be said about this later. These were the first boats to have Packard engines installed from the start (although the installation was hastily designed and gave much trouble) and two rudders were fitted.

The first two boats of the series, MTB 73-74, retained the curved pattern of bridge wind deflector used in preceding boats. The second boat, MTB 74, was taken in hand and radically refitted for special operations. Starting with MTB 75, the simple “straight” pattern of bridge wind deflector that is depicted in the kit came into use (MTB 73 was retrofitted). Not all the boats were built by Vosper, some were sub-contracted to other yards. They were built to Vosper’s design under the firm’s supervision. Some of the later built boats (MTB 80, 86, 89, and 97 are known) had bridge spray shields of a slightly different pattern. A third rudder was found necessary and was retrofitted to the boats starting in early 1943. This is not easily detected in photos, as it was slaved to the starboard rudder and the installation was below the waterline. Other minor differences to armament and fittings became manifest over time as individual boats were modified in service.

The 1940 Programme also included a separate order to J. Samual White for 12 boats (MTB 201-212). For a previous contract (MTBs 41-49) this company had produced hybrids that combined elements of their own design with Vosper’s, but this time they were instructed to strictly comply to the 1940 Vosper design. Most of them were fitted with Admiralty Stirling engines in lieu of Packards. They had an alternative style of engine coolant water outlet, but otherwise can be reproduced from the kit with little modification.

For the 1941 Programme, 20 boats were ordered (MTBs 222-241). They repeated the 1940 design without modification. All were built by sub-contractors. In addition, Vosper received an order for four boats to replace boats of the 1939 series that had been destroyed prior to delivery due to German bombing. These were given new numbers (MTBs 242-245), as they also were built to the 1940 design and not that of the originals. J.S. White again received an order for 12 boats. The kit is suitable for only the first six of these (MTBs 246-251). The last six boats of this order were again White/Vosper hybrids, with a completely different hull designed by White.

The British sought additional manufacturing capacity in North America. Vosper was in the process of arranging licensed production of boats in US shipyards when the Lend-lease Act was passed in April 1941. Lend-Lease orders were processed through the US Navy. The first order in 1941 was for 32 boats (MTBs 275-306), and they were built to the 1940 design drawings provided by Vosper. These boats, built in four US shipyards, were identical to their British counterparts in appearance, although it became apparent that some of the manufacturers deviated from specifications in their construction. (This resulted in lighter, but less sturdy boats. Many were turned over to the Royal Indian Navy.)

Vosper declined to release the drawings for the 1942 series boats, so the 32 boats of the1942 Lend- Lease production (MTBs 363-378 and 396-411) were built to the 1940 design again, with minor modifications to masts, rigging and armament. These 32 units can be identified by the noticeable deletion of the hull scuttles (portholes).

In summary: By my reckoning 132 boats were built to this basic design.

MTB 73-98 (26 boats, 1940 Programme)
MTB 201-212 (12 boats, 1940 Programme, JS White)
MTB 222-241 (20 boats, 1941 Programme)
MTB 242-245) (4 boats, replacements for 1939 Progamme MTBs 33, 37, 39, 40)
MTB 246-251 (6 boats, 1941 Programme, JS White)
MTB 275-306 (32 boats, 1941 Lend-Lease, USA -built)
MTB 363-378 (16 boats, 1942 Lend-Lease, USA-built, no scuttles)
MTB 396-411 (16 boats, 1942 Lend-Lease, USA-built, no scuttles)

With the exception of MTB 74, any of them can be built from the Italeri kit without major plastic surgery. While the above provides a general guide, for differences in rig of individual boats you will need to closely check your references.

For the more ambitious:

The immediate predecessors of the 1940 series boats were 10 boats (MTBs 57-66) that were authorized under a War Expansion Programmme approved in late 1939. Sources frequently lump these boats together with the 10 boats of the original 1939 Programme (MTBs 31-40), but they were quite different. They were built during 1940-41 while the 1940 design was being developed, and emerged as amalgams of the 1939 and 1940 designs. They incorporated the same“wide-beam” hull used by the 1940 series, as depicted in the kit. However, their fuel system was in accordance with the 1939 design, with all the tanks located forward of the engine spaces. They retained the main deck layout of the preceding boats, so their armament was positioned differently, the .5- in Vickers Mk V turret being located slightly further aft and the torpedo tubes slightly more forward. This is difficult to see in photos unless you know what to look for. John Lambert’s excellent drawings of MTB 57 illustrate the differences, as does the artwork in Warship Profile No. 7. A conversion of the kit would require substantial changes to (or replacement of) the main deck, but the hull and most of the fittings would be quite suitable.

For the 1942 Programme (MTB 347-362), Vosper sought to “tweak” their design. Additional wartime equipment had increased weight and decreased performance. As part of the effort to counter this, the fuel system reverted back to that of the 1939 boats with all tanks located forward. The deck layout and position of the armament returned to the configuration of MTBs 57-66, with some alterations to simplify ventilation. The steering position in the wheelhouse was eliminated and its windows blanked off. Again, the kit hull and most fittings can be used in the conversion. John Lambert’s drawings of MTB 347 can be relied on to illustrate all the necessary changes.

Under contract CP BR8b/45096/40, Vosper extensively modified one of the 1940 boats, MTB 74, for special operations. The original armament and much of the bridge structure was removed. Two Admiralty pattern 18” LC torpedo tubes were mounted on the raised foredeck. The boat was never used for the intended operation (an ambitious scheme to attack the Scharnhorst while in port at Brest), but was used (and lost) in the St. Nazaire raid of 27/28 March 1942. Again, John Lambert’s plans are an excellent source detailing the changes. The boat was painted in a unique camouflage scheme, and would make a fascinating project, although the 18” tubes, rails, and firing gear would require extensive scratch-building.

As mentioned, the Vosper design was used in the US as a basis for a Lend-Lease order produced for the USSR. These boats were an amalgam of Vosper design elements and US equipment, produced without Vosper’s co-operation. While they were referred to as “Vospers”, the firm was not involved in their development. They were armed with two US 21-in Mk 19 torpedo tubes, a single 20mm Oerlikon on a Mk 10 mount, and two manually operated twin .50 cal air-cooled Colt-Browning machine guns in tubs aft of the bridge. The gun tubs required that the bridge and pilothouse be relocated forward. The shape of the foredeck was altered, changing the shape of the torpedo troughs, but otherwise the hull was the same as that in the kit. Many of the fittings were different, and a great deal of scratch-building will be required for a conversion. John Lambert has produced appropriate plans for one of these boats, PT 723.

I believe that that is about all that can reasonably be produced from this kit. Other Vosper MTBs of earlier and later series had significantly different hulls. If some truly ambitious modeler undertakes to model one of them, the kit can still supply useful fittings, and I wish them all the best.

IMPRESSIONS OF THE KIT (Build in progress)

The kit comes in a large box, very well packaged to prevent the large, heavy hull from damaging the smaller components. Despite this, sprue C in my kit had been “squashed” at some point, possibly prior to boxing, and the forward wheelhouse (part 10C) was bent and distorted. I considered asking Italeri for a replacement, but some careful work with hot water, straightedge pliers, and superglue yielded a perfectly satisfactory repair during assembly.

Many of the plastic components are quite large and appropriately thick. The molding alignment is excellent, but the gage and quality of the plastic results in rather more heat sink distortions on the surface of the parts than I would like to see. Most of them are quite subtle and can be corrected with light sanding alone, but the work is a bit tedious and care must be taken not to damage details. Fit is reasonably good with normal clean up.

Italeri researched their subject. I have John Lambert/Al Ross’s plans, and after reducing them to 1/35 scale, the kit matches up very well. The decal sheet includes pennant numbers for MTBs 73, 77, and 97. The kit is designed to represent 77 as delivered. Be aware that 73 as built had a different bridge wind deflector, and 97 differently shaped spray shields. I wish Italeri had included some optional parts, particularly the third rudder. Cost was probably a factor.

Italeri includes a small brochure about the design history of the boats. It features an excellent selection of very useful photos. The brief text is actually fairly comprehensive, but unfortunately it contains a number of errors.

There are 252 plastic parts including the display stand, remarkably few for a kit of this size. Many of the large components, notably the torpedo tubes and rails, are molded in partially completed sub- assemblies. This has advantages; it saves time and assures strength and alignment. The disadvantage is the restriction it imposes on molding, limiting detail to some degree. Italeri seems to have tailored their parts breakdown judiciously, opting for strength and simplicity in the larger components with an eye to those who will want to convert the model for R/C running. This results in some compromises. Overall, the level of detail is good, but it does not rise to excellent: For that the modeler will have to rely on some scratch-building or after-market additions.

A moderate number of details are accommodated on a photo-etched fret. The gage of the brass is appropriately heavy, and at this scale many of the components could just as well have been done in plastic. None the less, it is well executed and the parts fit well. Undoubtedly, after-market manufacturers will be developing additional detail sets.

I like the laser cut acetate that is supplied for all windows and portholes. It is easy to use and far superior to conventional clear molded plastic.
Hidden screws help hold the deck to the hull. They are probably unnecessary in a display model, but will be a boon to R/C conversions.

Two complete Mk IX torpedoes are provided. Other than sink marks, these are very nicely done and clean up beautifully. Four depth charges are provided. I found it easier to replace the casings (parts 17D/71D/15D/69D) with appropriate sized plastic tube cut to length and beveled.

I am building a display model. I have been working on the kit for about four weeks. Most of this time has been cleaning up parts and adding detail where I deem it necessary. The bridge and pilothouse have a level of detail that many modelers will find adequate, but I have excellent references on these areas and am “going to town”! The bridge is being reworked, with more accurate representation of the internal structure and the wiring replaced. Due to molding limits, the bridge storage lockers are not square, and have canvas covers molded over all openings. These have been rebuilt, opening them up and truing all surfaces. The interior of the pilothouse can be seen through the windows and open door, and although the view is restricted I want what can be seen to match the level of detail of the exterior. Alterations were necessary, as the boat I am building had the steering station removed from this space. The aft bulkhead detail is completely lacking, and this has been added. The torpedo tube railings are rather heavily done. They lack some of the lightening holes and a great many bolts. They have been thinned to improve their appearance, and the missing detail added.

Modelers will want to explore armament variations. Many boats were fitted with the Oerlikon 20mm cannon. Looking to the aftermarket, Accurate Armour and CMK produce complete guns and mounts. The AA kit (S-14) is made up of both resin and PE brass. It is very nice, but pricey, and the mount is the Mk I which was not used on Vospers as it was too heavy for them. CMK (RA045) is all resin. It has the appropriate lighter Mk IIA mount. The Mk IX twin Oerlikon mount replaced the twin .5 inch Vickers turret on some boats. For this, Talhoer produces a nice kit (TLH GUN-01), complete with the bandstand and a figure, all in white metal. Turned metal Oerlikon barrels are available from RB (35B77) and Lion Roar (LB3530). A less well known fitting was the installation of a captured Italian Breda 20/65 cannon on the bow. This was seen on a number of boats in the Mediterranean, including MTB 77. Italeri produces this weapon in plastic (ITA6464).

In summary, the Italeri Vosper is a good value. It accurately captures the lines of the prototype, with no gross shape errors of the sort that can ruin a kit. Many modelers will be happy to build it just as it is. R/C enthusiasts will find it suitable for a running boat, and the obsessive will find it a good base for further detailing, or conversion.


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PostPosted: Mon Feb 20, 2012 8:15 am 
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Hi Mike, excellent review and I appreciate all the historical info you've discussed, thats really helped with my own research into these MTBs.

I hope you don't mind some input from a total newbie to these forums, I joined specifically because I got the Italeri Vosper as a Christmas present!

You mention the larger spray-shields fitted to the later boats in the first batch (80 to 97), I've tracked down images of 81, 82 and 84 as well that seem to show the same arrangement, the shields are also well illustrated by the picture on page 115 of Lamberts 'Allied Torpedo Boats' and they appear to be tied to the addition of two tall lockers, I don't know the purpose of the lockers for certain but they look to be about the right size for rifle-racks.

I also noticed that the bridge deflector on these boats looks to be of a simpler and more angular design, with shorter 'wings' each side of the bridge, again the picture in ATB shows this and there is another image on page 40 in the Squadron 'Vosper MTBs in action' that shows the shape as well.

Something you didn't mention in your comments is the Radar fit for the various boats, as supplied the kit comes with a Type 286 array for the main mast done in etched-brass which is awfully fragile, with some chopping you could modify the parts to represent a Type 291U.

A very poorly detailed plastic 240/241 IFF comes with a short mast to mount on the bow. This part really needs a lot of fiddly work to make it look right, the basic "Y" shape is good but the details need to be replaced. The IFF was often moved to the starboard side of the bridge, mounted on the deflector coaming just forward of the main mast, particularly if a weapon was added forward of the wheelhouse for obvious reasons! It was also mounted on a bracket on the front of the main mast on some boats.

The torpedo tubes are a bit of a let-down, I expect most will be satisfied as they look the part once all the fittings are on, but the mounting rails, supports and all the missing bolt-head detail is disappointing, I can see Italeri have gone for strength and ease of assembly so I can't fault them for that, and fancy slide-mould tooling would only have hiked the price, all the same I'm going to rebuild the rails and mounts from scratch and do away with the clunky moulded 'saddles' under the tubes. ABER do a sheet of various nut and bolt sizes in brass etch and a selection of these look ideal for pimping-out the tubes.

ABER also do a very nice little set for the Breda 20/65 which includes a turned aluminium barrel and small fret of fittings.

The wheelhouse interior needs some help, like you say the rear wall is virtually a blank canvas, there is no interior detail in the Mk.V mount, you can't see much once the guns are in place but I'm going to add the structure, ammo cans and spent-cartridge boxes, just so I know they are there.

The depth charge racks need a bit of TLC as well, the ring thats moulded on for the retaining cables to pass through should be held in place by the release mechanism which Italeri have missed completely. The ring is the link for the two ends of the retaining cable, not fixed to the rack.

Whats lacking are some nice crew figures, I expect Italeris will release a set soon but I'm hoping a good figure manufacturer like Friendship or maybe New World Miniatures will get behind this kit, there are a couple of suitable figures of ratings in the Wee Friends line but to date nobody has done a decent figure of an officer.

Again, thanks for the great review.


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PostPosted: Mon Feb 20, 2012 8:38 pm 
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Doubt I'll ever build this boat in this scale, but that's a hell of a review and great orientation for those who are - thanks for your efforts to post here.

D-Boy


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PostPosted: Fri Feb 24, 2012 9:51 am 
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Thanks guys. I’ve been digging for information on these boats, and what’s out there is pretty sparse. Much of what I have comes from piecing together the bits that can be verified, so I appreciate any input or critique.

I have been trying to get a complete understanding of the different spray shield patterns and which boats had the style that I will refer to as the “rectangular” shape (as seen in the photo of MTB 97 on page 115 of Lambert’ “Allied Torpedo Boats”). I thought it might relate to sequence or sub-contractor, but I found boats with what looked to be this style scattered throughout all the series, with no apparent logic. However, I had made an error in assuming that there were only two patterns, when there are in fact three. Close examination shows that some boats with the “angular” pattern (as per the kit) were modified with extensions, resulting in a similar appearance to the “rectangular” design seen on MTB 97. Here’s an example: MTB 86. This photo is not as clear as the hi-res original but if you look closely you can still make out the joint line of the original shield and the additional fitting.
Attachment:
mtb 86-966843.jpg
mtb 86-966843.jpg [ 32.67 KiB | Viewed 13838 times ]


I think you are correct in that spray shield shape is the result of the arrangement of bridge stowage lockers. If so, modification to stowage would require modification to the shields.

So far, what I can state is that MTBs 80, 81, and 97 are the only boats I can definitely identify as built with the “rectangular” design. They are from the last of the 1940 programme boats built by Vosper (Portsmith). This sub-series would include 80-85 and 97-98, and I would dearly love to find photos of any of them to verify if they were all fitted this way.

I have found numerous examples of 1940/1941 boats with the “angular” pattern modified to the “rectangular” style. They include MTBs 86, 89, 205, 208, 209, 224, 238, and I am sure there are others. As yet, I have not found evidence of this modification on any of the US built or 1942 programme boats.

As to the radar and electronics, I’m not too pleased with the kit parts, as the photo etch is two-dimensional and the plastic parts are clunky. I will be re-building this from scratch. As you mention, rig varied from boat to boat.

We need to get some discussion going on Calling All Ships Fans!

Happy modeling, Mike


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PostPosted: Fri Feb 24, 2012 10:37 am 
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One day I'd love to build this one: a British hull, an US mast from a PT boat, Italian torpedoes, a German Vierlingsflak and a Breda '35 to round it up; but first I have to figure out which MTB she was, when built, to see if it can be converted from Italeri's without major surgery. In Italian service, she was renamed MAS 433

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PostPosted: Fri Feb 24, 2012 10:38 am 
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Mike, thank you for that excellent review of this kit. Your review has definitely made up my mind that I'm going to have to add this kit to my stash. Italieri seems to be carving out quite a nice for itself in producing high quality 1/35 MTB kits. I'm currently working on the excellent P.T. 596 kit, and if this Vosper kit is anywhere near as good as the 596 kit is, it is an excellent kit. I've found with the 596 kit that much of the molded on detail is so good that, even though I have the equally excellent LionRoar upgrade set, I have elected to keep the molded on detail in preference to scraping it off and using the PE, which in many cases does not add anything special to the molded on details. This is clearly a case where using the PE in preference to the molded on detail would simply be a case of using PE for the sake of using PE - something I do not do. My philosophy is to forgo PE unless it truly adds to the build.

In this large scale the molded on details do not appear to me to be over sized, and in fact, the PE parts intended to replace much of the molded on detail are no more fine or detailed that the molded on detail itself.

I'm assuming, and your review would appear to bear this out, that the Vosper kit has the same virtues. In fact, given my experience with the 596, I would be highly tempted to build the Vosper right out of the box, using only the PE included in the kit. (The 596 has some very nice PE included in the kit as well.)

The only problem I see is the space required to display these monsters, considering that I want to build not only the 596, but also the Vosper and the up coming 103 Class Elco 80 footer apparently to be marketed as "P.T. 109" - though I will probably do her as a different early 103 Class boat.

Thanks again for your very informative review. Now, if I can just figure out how to slip this one past the C-in-C!

Bob

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PostPosted: Fri Feb 24, 2012 1:28 pm 
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Mike Sills wrote:
Thanks guys. I’ve been digging for information on these boats, and what’s out there is pretty sparse. Much of what I have comes from piecing together the bits that can be verified, so I appreciate any input or critique.


I'm working much the same way Mike, though my credit card has taken a hammering getting hold of some reference books too!

Quote:
Close examination shows that some boats with the “angular” pattern (as per the kit) were modified with extensions, resulting in a similar appearance to the “rectangular” design seen on MTB 97. Here’s an example: MTB 86. This photo is not as clear as the hi-res original but if you look closely you can still make out the joint line of the original shield and the additional fitting.


This image of 86 is a bit clearer than the one you posted, I can't remember its source now, I found it via Google, 86 also turns up in a picture in 'Mediterranean MTBs at War', the join line you're talking about is much more distinct in this image:

Image

I hadn't noticed this at all until you mentioned it then the line in the picture suddenly made sense to me. It looks like the add-on panel was a different shape at the rear as well, more angular, the larger fitted spray shields as on 97 are radiused at the top corner and fitted with a moulded trim all the way round and down the vertical to the deck.

Quote:
I think you are correct in that spray shield shape is the result of the arrangement of bridge stowage lockers. If so, modification to stowage would require modification to the shields.


I wish I knew for sure what the taller lockers were for, as I said they look the right size for rifle-racks and given that these boats were constantly being fitted with heavier weapons as time went on I can believe thats what they are, rifles for the crew for close-in fighting.


Quote:
This sub-series would include 80-85 and 97-98, and I would dearly love to find photos of any of them to verify if they were all fitted this way.


I've found two images of 82, the better one is in 'Mediterranean MTBs at War', on page 57, although the picture is quite grainy and with too much contrast for fine details you can make out the curved spray shield as per the kit, the second pic is below and again came from a Google search, its also very poor but there is just enough detail to make out the curve of the kit-style spray shield if you look closely:

Image

N.B: The pic of 82 in 'Mediterranean MTBs at War' also shows the she was fitted with a Breda 20/65 on the foredeck at some point. I think one of John Lamberts plans mentions that 86 was eventually fitted with a single 20mm Oerlikon.

Quote:
I have found numerous examples of 1940/1941 boats with the “angular” pattern modified to the “rectangular” style. They include MTBs 86, 89, 205, 208, 209, 224, 238, and I am sure there are others. As yet, I have not found evidence of this modification on any of the US built or 1942 programme boats.


This is conjecture on my part but it is possible that the 'add-on' shield you're seeing is a result of a kit issued for local (field) modification, whereas the more integrated and better finished style as on MTB 97 is the factory-fit?

Quote:
We need to get some discussion going on Calling All Ships Fans!

Happy modeling, Mike


I agree, these boats aren't all as straightfoward as it seems, and I'm now back to researching the boat I wanted to model, MTB 84 to work out these spray shields and the bridge-deflector shape.

It's meant to be a hobby... It's meant to be a hobby...


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PostPosted: Sun Feb 26, 2012 12:31 pm 
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Hello from Holland,

My build is underway, after the Italeri S100 (RC conversion) The Vosper will be sailing this summer.
Althoug not the exact correct kit for the real one I try to make the 240 serving under Dutch flag during WW2 and one year after. Color scheme's are rare and some ships were painted with the available paint in the dock and the artistic mind of the crew. So not exactly true but close enough for me. The challange for me is the conversion to RC.

Look at info here:
http://www.modelbouwforum.nl/forums/bou ... tb-rc.html

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PostPosted: Mon Feb 27, 2012 11:02 pm 
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Location: St. Charles, IL
Hi All.

I've posted some photos of my build in progress on the "Calling All Ship Fans" section of the forum.(Small Ships and Boats, Vosper 70' MTBs)
See you all there!

Mike


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PostPosted: Wed Nov 21, 2012 4:51 pm 
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Secondo wrote:
One day I'd love to build this one: a British hull, an US mast from a PT boat, Italian torpedoes, a German Vierlingsflak and a Breda '35 to round it up; but first I have to figure out which MTB she was, when built, to see if it can be converted from Italeri's without major surgery. In Italian service, she was renamed MAS 433

Image





MTB 410.


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PostPosted: Thu Nov 22, 2012 3:53 pm 
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cdsc123 wrote:
MTB 410.


Thanks! :thumbs_up_1:

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PostPosted: Tue Jan 29, 2013 12:23 pm 
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Hi stumbled on this post by following cdsc123's wake...

I have the CMK 1/35th resin 20mm & the Talhoer Twin 20mm, with the intention of doing an appropriate MTB, I am looking for appropriate pennant numbers/batch for a June'44 boat, with any guidance as to any model-specific fits to get the boat broadly right.

thanks in anticipation


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PostPosted: Sat Aug 01, 2015 10:08 am 
Hi Mike,

I have just been reading your excellent review of the Italeri 1:35th scale MTB. My wife bought me the kit not long ago, after reading your review I see you finish off by saying MTB 77 was fitted with a Breda 20mm gun. I have the Breda kit in my stash and would like to fit it to the MTB. There is a part in the Breda kit (D3) that looks like it could be a deck fitting although no reference is made to this in the instructions at all. Do you know what type of deck fitting was used at all please? Any help would be of great assistance.

Thank you.

Gaz.


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