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PostPosted: Fri Jun 28, 2019 9:15 pm 
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the bow area I would build it up with .040"(1mm) plastic strips, let the glue cure then carve with knife, grind with Dremel tool then sand to shape. that is what I do on my OBB kitbash.
viewtopic.php?f=59&t=165105
did that also on my 1/144 Warspite & Mitscher.


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PostPosted: Fri Jun 28, 2019 9:31 pm 
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I basically did that also on my build and I may have included some of that description during the process. I can't recall exactly. It's in the Completed forum for those who wish to read it.

I'm trying to stay away from telling another modeler what construction methods to use on this kit - that's something they've got to figure out for themselves. In this situation there are quite a few ways to skin the proverbial cat, so to speak!

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Builder's yard:
USS PENNSYLVANIA (BB-38) Late '40 1:200
USS STODDARD (DD-566) 66-68 1:144
Finished:
USS NEW JERSEY (BB-62) 67-69 1:200
USN Sloop/Ship PEACOCK (1813) 1:48
ROYAL CAROLINE (1748) 1:47
AVS (1768) 1:48


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PostPosted: Sat Jun 29, 2019 8:53 am 
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I sawed off the hull abaft the superstructure, and rebuilt it using FDD plans and styrene and bulkhead construction:

https://www.dropbox.com/s/ajtk5jxqngz7ypj/Photo%20Apr%2013%2C%2010%2058%2035%20AM.jpg?dl=0

https://www.dropbox.com/s/m6t9r52ae4cq5vm/Photo%20Apr%2013%2C%2010%2059%2025%20AM.jpg?dl=0

https://www.dropbox.com/s/7w02hbk9awvvnxg/Photo%20Apr%2013%2C%2010%2058%2051%20AM.jpg?dl=0

I also built up the bulbous forefoot:

https://www.dropbox.com/s/d9gyjv9pxd4df19/Photo%20Apr%2013%2C%2010%2059%2006%20AM.jpg?dl=0

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PostPosted: Thu Jul 04, 2019 4:19 am 
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Location: Rybnik,Poland
Hello I have a question.
A colleague owns Iowa on a scale of 1/200 I have a question whether it can be converted into versions after modernization after 1980?
Where can the original dimensions of the superstructure be found?

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PostPosted: Thu Jul 04, 2019 4:38 am 
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wojtekp90 wrote:
Hello I have a question.
A colleague owns Iowa on a scale of 1/200 I have a question whether it can be converted into versions after modernization after 1980?
Where can the original dimensions of the superstructure be found?

I would recommend the book 'Iowa Class Battleships' by Robert F. Sumrall, https://www.amazon.com/Iowa-Class-Battleships-Weapons-Equipment/dp/0870212982
This book contains a large section on drawings, dimensions andsoforth. In my view the first reference Bible when modelling any of these ships, in the entire period of their life.

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PostPosted: Thu Jul 04, 2019 6:30 am 
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wojtekp90 wrote:
Quote:
Hello I have a question.
A colleague owns Iowa on a scale of 1/200 I have a question whether it can be converted into versions after modernization after 1980?
Where can the original dimensions of the superstructure be found?


In addition to Maarten's reply, I would add that the same inherent hull problems still exist in the kit. There are available online the 1982 Booklet of General Plans of NEW JERSEY which show the modernization done to that particular ship. IOWA will NOT be the same, but similar. The BoGF can be printed out at 0.96% for a 1/200 scale plan of the ship. Rule of thumb: BoGPs are NOT how the ship was actually built but how is was envisioned to be (modernized) constructed.

BoGPs do not contain dimensions or other engineering design properties that would be found on actual drawings/plans, etc.

Using this kit would probably end up being more scratchbuilding than I had to do when I kit-bashed my NEW JERSEY (1968-69) model. Most of the superstructure would be modified.

Hope this helps,

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BB62 vet 68-69

Builder's yard:
USS PENNSYLVANIA (BB-38) Late '40 1:200
USS STODDARD (DD-566) 66-68 1:144
Finished:
USS NEW JERSEY (BB-62) 67-69 1:200
USN Sloop/Ship PEACOCK (1813) 1:48
ROYAL CAROLINE (1748) 1:47
AVS (1768) 1:48


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PostPosted: Thu Jul 04, 2019 8:16 am 
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Quote:
BoGPs do not contain dimensions or other engineering design properties that would be found on actual drawings/plans, etc.

BB62vet is right, BUT:

As the frame locations are shown on the drawings in these BoGPs, and the frame distance is known (usually 4 ft or 48" throughout in USN battleships) it is very easy to accurately enlarge these drawings to the size/scale you want them. How do I know this distance? In the first pages of the BoGP the 'distance between perpendiculars' is given as 860 ft, in the drawings you can find that the aft perpendicular (rudder axis) is at frame 215 (the forward perpendicular is at frame 0). Divide 860 by 215 = 4 ft!

Just use a predefined grid in your drawing tool (I use CorelDraw) and align the frames with this grid. In your case the grid distance should be 0.24" (48"/200) for a an Iowa class battleship in 1:200 scale. Then stretch the drawing so that all frames match with the grid along the entire hull length. You'll find this procedure is VERY accurate.

BTW: by identifying the location of e.g. a bulkhead with its frame number, you can also calculate its distance to other locations (e.g. a turret) in the ship. And that's EXACT. Find the distance in frames, then multiply by 4, then divide by the desired scale, e.g. 1/200.

Note: 4 ft seems to be a sort of standard in the USN for BBs and Carriers, other ships though may have different frame distances, so look closely what's needed in your case.

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PostPosted: Thu Jul 04, 2019 9:00 am 
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wojtekp90 wrote:
Hello I have a question.
A colleague owns Iowa on a scale of 1/200 I have a question whether it can be converted into versions after modernization after 1980?
Where can the original dimensions of the superstructure be found?


I assume you mean the 1/200 Iowa kit from trumpeter. If you intend to use the original superstructure of the basis and core of the new superstructure, then keep in mind the dimension of trumoeter’s original superstructure is not entirely accurate, and different parts of the superstructure does not align completely with each other in accordance to how they do so on the real ship. So in your scratch building you will need to consider how the new built parts will align with existing parts of the trumpeter superstructure you intend to keep.

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PostPosted: Thu Jul 04, 2019 10:35 am 
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I upgraded and converted a 1:192 wooden model that I had built some 40 plus years earlier to a modern version of the Missouri. A lot more work than one might imagine. at least with a wooden model a lot easier to eliminate "stuff" such as gun tubs and other surgeries.

One thing that was invaluable was a couple of trips to the ship itself and taking of hundreds of photographs.

For the most part a scratch project, many fun challenges! Enjoy!


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PostPosted: Sat Jul 06, 2019 4:59 pm 
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Hi Folks,

Some time ago on this thread a fellow posted a page out of a book that had the colors of various compressed gas tanks. If I remember right the tanks were pretty much all black with the tops painted different colors to identify the gas inside. This picture is no longer available due to Photobucket's fiasco.

Is there anybody out there who might possibly have saved a copy of this photo and could either post it here or PM it to me. I thought I kept a copy but I can't find it anywhere.

Thanks,

Larry

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PostPosted: Sun Jul 07, 2019 9:49 am 
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steinerman wrote:
Hi Folks,

Some time ago on this thread a fellow posted a page out of a book that had the colors of various compressed gas tanks. If I remember right the tanks were pretty much all black with the tops painted different colors to identify the gas inside. This picture is no longer available due to Photobucket's fiasco.

Is there anybody out there who might possibly have saved a copy of this photo and could either post it here or PM it to me. I thought I kept a copy but I can't find it anywhere.


You're looking for "MIL-STD-101B". Put that into DuckDuckGo and you'll get a lot of download locations.


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PostPosted: Sun Jul 07, 2019 2:07 pm 
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This MIL-STD is current. I'm looking for the color identification back in 1944.

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Currently working on (and will be for years to come!)
1:200 USS Missouri (Monster Mo)


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PostPosted: Sun Jul 07, 2019 2:26 pm 
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Found it!! This was what I was looking for!

Attachment:
Compressed Gas Cylinder ID - 1044.jpg
Compressed Gas Cylinder ID - 1044.jpg [ 178.06 KiB | Viewed 4715 times ]

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1:200 USS Missouri (Monster Mo)


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PostPosted: Sun Jul 07, 2019 8:44 pm 
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I understand the shorter fatter cylinders are acetylene. I still never found any source of information that say exactly what type of gas are in the longer cylinders. I imagine many of them would be oxygen to use with acetylene for welding and cutting. But the gas ratio used of oxyacetylene welding is roughly 1 to 1, so on the Missouri there should be roughly one long oxygen cylinder for each fat acetylene cylinder if they are under similar pressures. Clearly there are far more long skinny cylinders than short fat ones. So what gas to those extra long skinny cylinders contain?

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PostPosted: Fri Jul 12, 2019 2:02 pm 
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chuck wrote:
So what gas to those extra long skinny cylinders contain?


I have a pile of blueprints for gas cylinder storage for different gas types from the 1980s. I never looked closely but will have to go through to see what they have.

I know there is oxygen, helium, acetylene, nitrogen. Probably others as well.


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PostPosted: Wed Jul 17, 2019 3:19 pm 
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Another question, guys. What color were the round life preservers on the Iowa class ships during WWII?

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PostPosted: Wed Jul 17, 2019 4:30 pm 
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Good question as the floats aboard battleships of the period typically were painted to match the camouflage scheme. Today the life rings are white.


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PostPosted: Thu Jul 18, 2019 9:42 am 
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bigjimslade wrote:
chuck wrote:
So what gas to those extra long skinny cylinders contain?


I have a pile of blueprints for gas cylinder storage for different gas types from the 1980s. I never looked closely but will have to go through to see what they have.

I know there is oxygen, helium, acetylene, nitrogen. Probably others as well.


I found CO2 and "medical gas" as well.

The plans for the Acetylene and Oxygen tank racks are identical so the cylinders would have to be the same size for both.


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PostPosted: Thu Jul 18, 2019 9:43 pm 
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The floating dry dock plans show acetylene cylinders were distinctly different from oxygen cylinders, acetylene cylinders being short and fat.

I think this may even be some kind of international standard during the WWII era. There are photos of tank repair depots on the eastern front that showed both the Russians and Germans used a tall skinny cylinder and a short fat cylinder in their portable oxyacetylene welding and cutting equipment.

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PostPosted: Sun Jul 21, 2019 10:24 pm 
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chuck wrote:
The floating dry dock plans show acetylene cylinders were distinctly different from oxygen cylinders, acetylene cylinders being short and fat.


The answer I got from asking around was the gas cylinders were gas cylinders. The same physical cylinders were used for all types of non-corrosive gases. The only difference was in the markings. Gas cylinders came (and still come) in various sizes. There is a 12" x 29" cylinder in use as well as a 12" x 41" cylinder.


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