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PostPosted: Wed Aug 19, 2015 11:34 pm 
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Here are some pictures of the fore top with the new AN/SPS-43 antenna in place.

Phil


Attachments:
forward tower 12.jpg
forward tower 12.jpg [ 138.14 KiB | Viewed 1999 times ]
forward tower 13.jpg
forward tower 13.jpg [ 130.53 KiB | Viewed 1999 times ]

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PostPosted: Mon Aug 24, 2015 7:28 am 
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Hi Phil
The link to your web site does not work i am building a model of the Oklahoma City
Frank DiMeglio


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PostPosted: Mon Aug 24, 2015 10:01 pm 
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Frank,

I went back through all the pages of this thread and tested the links and they all work from here.

Maybe you tried it while the server was down for service, or maybe when I was changing the page content.

Try again and let me know if you have a problem.

http://www.okieboat.com/

Phil

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PostPosted: Thu Aug 27, 2015 2:04 pm 
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I am catching up on loose ends. When I originally modelled the flag staff on the stern I had only low resolution pictures and 8mm movies to work from. This version was created from a few higher resolution images and dimensions from the original Oklahoma City flagstaff that is now at the American Legion Center in Newport, Oregon.

The CLG version of the ship had three different flagstaffs. The original from 1959 was short and fit into a socket on the main deck at the stern. A longer flag staff was installed in 1963 - it also fit into the socket on deck but it had two diagonal supports anchored to fittings on the deck.

This version was installed in 1969. It was supported on a pillar and had two braces attached to the top of the electronics cabinet just forward of the pillar.

In port the flagstaff was raised and the US Ensign flew from it. It was lowered for flight operations. When underway the flag flew from a gaff on the fore tower and the flag staff was stowed in a cradle on top of a nearby chock.

One less detail to be taken care of before starting on the forward superstructure!

Phil


Attachments:
flagstaff 27 Aug 2015 2 small.jpg
flagstaff 27 Aug 2015 2 small.jpg [ 113.86 KiB | Viewed 1965 times ]
flagstaff 27 Aug 2015 8 small.jpg
flagstaff 27 Aug 2015 8 small.jpg [ 130.56 KiB | Viewed 1965 times ]
File comment: Flag staff raised
flagstaff 27 Aug 2015 4 small.jpg
flagstaff 27 Aug 2015 4 small.jpg [ 111.74 KiB | Viewed 1965 times ]
File comment: Flag staff lowered
flagstaff 27 Aug 2015 5 small.jpg
flagstaff 27 Aug 2015 5 small.jpg [ 126.68 KiB | Viewed 1965 times ]

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PostPosted: Thu Aug 27, 2015 3:45 pm 
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Brilliant!

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PostPosted: Wed Sep 09, 2015 1:54 am 
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I'm still plodding along, working on the details for the forward superstructure. The ship carried large Kollmorgan 20x120 binoculars that were supported by posts port and starboard on the O4 level.

These were pretty complex and I had no plans. I worked from about a dozen photos I found on the Internet plus a couple of pictures of my own that showed the type of mounting. However, a seller on ebay did give the dimensions - but one dimension was wrong!

This thing was one of the most frustrating drawings yet. I used "photoguestimation" to determine dimensions, averaging the results from several photos to get the best result. Then I converted the result to English units as multiples of 1/16 inch. This is usually pretty accurate.

However, after drawing several complex parts I discovered that the X, Y and Z dimensions just didn't work out right. So I started over, making careful drawings of the whole thing, and then rebuilding the 3D pieces. Again, things just didn't match up. The width just didn't match the length and height.

Starting a third time I carefully measured two top down photos and discovered that the width given in the ebay sale was wrong. From the photos I could get the relative dimensions of the parts, but figuring out the actual dimensions in inches took quite a bit of trial and error. Finally everything clicked - dimensions on all three axes worked together.

So I drew the entire binoculars assembly a third time. But I discovered a mistake and had to redo one of the most complex parts a fourth time. And then I discovered another careless error on my part and had to do it again a fifth time! By this time I was really getting tired of looking at the thing!

Seventeen days and 23 pages of sketches and notes later it is done!

The binoculars were a separate assembly from the stand and were removed and stowed indoors when they weren't being used. The stand had a crank to adjust height and a mounting fitting - the triangular feature at the top. The binoculars had a matching socket that fit down over the part on the stand.

Phil


Attachments:
binoculars 8 Sep 2015 7 small.jpg
binoculars 8 Sep 2015 7 small.jpg [ 125.37 KiB | Viewed 1933 times ]
binoculars 8 Sep 2015 2 small.jpg
binoculars 8 Sep 2015 2 small.jpg [ 130.52 KiB | Viewed 1933 times ]
binoculars 8 Sep 2015 1 small.jpg
binoculars 8 Sep 2015 1 small.jpg [ 95.65 KiB | Viewed 1933 times ]
binoculars 8 Sep 2015 6 small.jpg
binoculars 8 Sep 2015 6 small.jpg [ 132.83 KiB | Viewed 1933 times ]

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PostPosted: Wed Sep 09, 2015 7:29 am 
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Absolutely brilliant work!

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PostPosted: Thu Sep 10, 2015 10:45 am 
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In contrast to the uncertainty in working from photos, I have the blueprints for some features of the ship, so I know the dimensions precisely. Well, for some things. After several decades of service some of the objects in the original blueprints had been changed quite a bit.

The wildcats on the bow were still the original mechanisms from 1943. The blueprints show not only the above deck details shown here, but the entire below deck mechanisms, plumbing, wiring, etc. It is an excess of details, and all this information presents the problem of sifting through it to find what I need. But this really isn't much of a problem. Hurt me!

The wildcats were large chain sprockets for the anchor chain. They were driven by hydraulic motors in the anchor windlass room on the second deck just below. They functioned independently, and control stands just aft of the wildcats operated them and the two capstans just outboard of the wildcats.

The chain came up from the chain locker at the bottom of the ship, fed around the wildcats and ran to the anchors. Chain stoppers attached to the main deck held the anchors in position until time to lower/raise the anchor. While the stoppers were in place the brakes were released on the wildcats to reduce strain on the mechanisms.

Phil


Attachments:
wildcat 9 Sept 2015 1 small.jpg
wildcat 9 Sept 2015 1 small.jpg [ 140.33 KiB | Viewed 1916 times ]
wildcat 9 Sept 2015 2 small.jpg
wildcat 9 Sept 2015 2 small.jpg [ 117.62 KiB | Viewed 1916 times ]
wildcat 9 Sept 2015 3 small.jpg
wildcat 9 Sept 2015 3 small.jpg [ 125.31 KiB | Viewed 1916 times ]
wildcat 9 Sept 2015 4 small.jpg
wildcat 9 Sept 2015 4 small.jpg [ 126.5 KiB | Viewed 1916 times ]
bow details 9 Sep 2015 small.jpg
bow details 9 Sep 2015 small.jpg [ 105.06 KiB | Viewed 1916 times ]

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PostPosted: Sat Sep 12, 2015 10:19 pm 
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I took out some time from working on the forward superstructure details to fiddle with the hull. There were some details, like the new flagstaff and the reworked wildcats that I wanted to add. So here are a few pictures of the hull and main deck.

I need to put in all of the lifelines and the nets around the flight deck. Then I need to create the boards of the wooden deck to replace the temporary monocolor placeholder used here.

Phil


Attachments:
hull 9 Sep 2015 1 small.jpg
hull 9 Sep 2015 1 small.jpg [ 99.19 KiB | Viewed 1897 times ]
hull 9 Sep 2015 2 small.jpg
hull 9 Sep 2015 2 small.jpg [ 124.62 KiB | Viewed 1897 times ]
hull 9 Sep 2015 3 small.jpg
hull 9 Sep 2015 3 small.jpg [ 120.62 KiB | Viewed 1897 times ]

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PostPosted: Mon Nov 09, 2015 4:00 am 
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I'm back at work on the forward superstructure. I first started modeling this in 2006. Then I set out to model most of the rest of the ship and I am just getting back to finishing the forward superstructure. In the nine years since I first drew up the basic shapes I have become much more proficient at CAD modeling. I took a few shortcuts back then that have come back to bite me in the posterior, so I decided to redraw everything. Just about all that remains of the nine year old drawing is the part in red at the rear, under the smoke pipe. This is the forward uptake, and I'll rework it next.

I have added the air ports (port holes), flag bags, binnacle and AN/SQM-6 weather satellite antenna. The basic interiors of the navigation bridge and flag bridge are there, but someday I want to add details to the navigation bridge. I still have a lot of doors, ladders, life rails, vent ducts, wiring and such to add.

The dual 5"/38 mount foundation is in place but I won't add it until about everything else is done. Ditto for the Mk 38 director. These assemblies will add a lot to the file size and if I added them now they would slow down drawing and rendering operations.

The hole at the rear of the O5 level deck is where the forward radar tower and the O6 ECM shack will go. That is another huge drawing that will go on last.

Phil


Attachments:
Forward superstructure 8 Nov 2015 1.jpg
Forward superstructure 8 Nov 2015 1.jpg [ 131.39 KiB | Viewed 1842 times ]
Forward superstructure 8 Nov 2015 3.jpg
Forward superstructure 8 Nov 2015 3.jpg [ 123.51 KiB | Viewed 1842 times ]

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PostPosted: Wed Nov 11, 2015 10:52 pm 
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The forward uptakes were a bit of a problem. I have the original Cleveland blueprints, and they show three boiler air intakes on each side of the forward and aft uptakes. These are all 48" high, but varied in width. The openings were placed between vertical stiffeners spaced on half frames (24"), and because the surface is curved the distance between the verticals was not the same for each opening. These vents were made to fit the spacing between the vertical stiffeners.

The early Cleveland class ships were built this way, but it must not have been enough opening to provide sufficient air for the boilers. Later ships had several variations, including double sets of openings one above the other, vertically elongated openings and four openings instead of three. Additionally, the early ships had horizontal baffles inside the openings to deflect rain and spray, but later ships had vertical baffles.

Photos of the USS Oklahoma City CLG-5 show four openings on the port side. Most photos show no openings on the starboard side because of clutter (boat davits) and photo angle, so for a long time I thought there were no openings on the starboard. However, I have two photos taken close up from the pier at starboard midships, and both clearly show one vent near the forward edge of the uptakes.

But these vents, port and starboard, were clearly taller than 48 inches. Furthermore the starboard vent and the fore most port vent were farther forward than the vents on the original Clevelands. So, using photoguestimation measurements from photos I determined the vents to be about 57 inches high, and I placed the additional forward vents between stiffeners at half-frame spacing. Photos of the original USS Springfield CL-66 show this same arrangement port and starboard in 1944.

USS Little Rock CLG-4 and USS Providence CLG-6 had five vents on the port side and apparently none on the starboard. The USS Galveston GLG-3 had five vents on the port side but I have no photos of the starboard side.

Phil


Attachments:
Forward uptakes port.jpg
Forward uptakes port.jpg [ 101.95 KiB | Viewed 1815 times ]
Forward uptakes stbd.jpg
Forward uptakes stbd.jpg [ 107.5 KiB | Viewed 1815 times ]

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PostPosted: Thu Nov 12, 2015 12:06 am 
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Wow! :worship_1:

MB

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USS San Francisco
USS Helena
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PostPosted: Fri Nov 20, 2015 3:48 am 
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More detail for the forward superstructure. This is the Mk 32 dual 5"/38 gun mount.

I originally drew this many years ago and I thought it was complete except for details on the case ejection chute doors.

But someone on the forum pointed out that the guns did not have a step (where the dark grey ring is in the pictures below) change in diameter, as almost all Navy Ordnance Pamphlets show, but they actually had a gradual taper. So I redrew the guns.

I also checked the overall dimensions of the original drawing, and they were correct except for the gun port width. And I decided to add the seals around the shield in the gun port.

Then I noticed a few things that could be drawn better ... So what was supposed to be an afternoon of work stretched out into four or five days.

Part of the problem with these mounts is the great variety of Marks and Mods that were produced. Several different types were used on the Clevelands, and on the subsequent CLGs. What I show here is based upon Navy OPs and a lot of photos of the mount on the Okie Boat.

Phil


Attachments:
5-38 dual mount small 1.jpg
5-38 dual mount small 1.jpg [ 135.48 KiB | Viewed 1776 times ]
5-38 dual mount small 2.jpg
5-38 dual mount small 2.jpg [ 119.77 KiB | Viewed 1776 times ]
5-38 dual mount small 3.jpg
5-38 dual mount small 3.jpg [ 133.83 KiB | Viewed 1776 times ]
5-38 dual mount small 4.jpg
5-38 dual mount small 4.jpg [ 115.41 KiB | Viewed 1776 times ]

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PostPosted: Sat Nov 28, 2015 3:35 am 
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The ship had six 12" searchlights. At first I thought they were all alike, but after studying many photos it is apparent that there were four like the one shown in these pictures and two others slightly different. Thanks to Tracy White for drawings of the searchlights. It looks like I have drawings for both types.

The starboard signal platform shown in these pictures is a good illustration of the problems I have had trying to figure out the configuration of the USS Oklahoma City in mid 1971. Just about every time we went into a Navy base something was changed. Early photos from 1959 through 1963 show this searchlight mounted on the aft side of the platform - where the panel with the switch boxes is in the pictures. Later photos from 1975 through 1979 show the searchlight where I have placed it in the model.

But when was it changed - before or after mid 1971? I have been trying to figure this out for many years. I found photos from 1969 and 1970 with it on the aft side of the platform and more photos from 1972 on that showed it on the outboard side! Then I found a photo dated February 1971 showing the light still on the aft side - so it was changed sometime in 1971.

Finally I found two very good pictures, both dated March 1971. One showed it on the aft side and the other showed it on the outboard end of the platform. So it was changed in March 1971.

Checking the ship's history I see that the ship was at the Ship Repair Facility Yokosuka from 21 February through 16 March 1971. Both the port and starboard signal platforms were modified at this time and the searchlights were moved outboard.

Why was it changed? Look at the attached photo of a signalman using the searchlight on the port signal bridge, signalling a ship forward of the OK City. The mounting arm of the searchlight was just 12" long. When mounted on the aft side of the platform it was easy to signal ships abeam and aft of the beam. But to signal a ship ahead the signalman had to climb up on the coaming and lean out over the edge of the platform with his legs wrapped around the lower railing in order to get behind the light. Part of the upper life rail had been cut away, and a rope across the gap gave the man something to lean against while he was using the light. It was a pretty screwball arrangement, but they used it from 1959 through 1971!

The modified platform with the light outboard made it much easier to signal ships from dead ahead through abeam.

Phil


Attachments:
stbd signal platform small 1.jpg
stbd signal platform small 1.jpg [ 141.36 KiB | Viewed 1733 times ]
stbd signal platform small 2.jpg
stbd signal platform small 2.jpg [ 134.31 KiB | Viewed 1733 times ]
Port signal bridge small.jpg
Port signal bridge small.jpg [ 122.94 KiB | Viewed 1733 times ]

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PostPosted: Sat Nov 28, 2015 9:49 am 
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Brilliant!

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PostPosted: Sun Dec 27, 2015 2:19 am 
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More work on the forward superstructure. I have been adding life rails and lifelines, working up from the O1 level. Finished railings are white, and those that are almost done, but need checking, are in red. Occasionally while working on these I add some detail like ladders and downspouts.

Around the dual 5"/38 mount the lifelines are replaced by nets similar to those around the flight deck back aft. I have to confess these are some of my least favorite parts of the model. It is a huge amount of work to produce each of the strands, making the whole look as if it is sagging under the pull of gravity.

Perhaps the only thing that is more exasperating is tying knots in the lanyards for the flags and other small stuff. It is so easy to tie a knot with real cord. But something that might take a few seconds to tie with cord can take hours in CAD!

Phil


Attachments:
forward superstructure small 2.jpg
forward superstructure small 2.jpg [ 140.38 KiB | Viewed 1676 times ]
forward life nets small 2.jpg
forward life nets small 2.jpg [ 134.12 KiB | Viewed 1676 times ]

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PostPosted: Sun Dec 27, 2015 6:37 am 
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This is really impressive!

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PostPosted: Wed Jan 20, 2016 11:57 pm 
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I have gotten around to one of the puzzling little details of the ship. This is the MK 23 Mod 0 Target Designation Transmitter. The OK City had two of these at the top of the forward superstructure at the O5 level Forward Air Control. Most of the photos I found are from a distance, fuzzy, and show these with a bag over them, so I really didn't know what they were!

But thanks to Art Tilley who participates in work crews on the USS Little Rock museum ship in Buffalo I have about a dozen good close up photos to work from.

I'm not sure when the MK 23s were introduced, but they may be WWII technology. The ship originally had at least four of them, two at the top of the forward superstructure and two on the after superstructure open wings. The after superstructure was reworked in 1963 and the platforms were removed that carried the aft TDTs.

A pair of binoculars was attached in front of the head cushion. The operator rotated the top assembly around the vertical axis (bearing) and rotated the arm with the binoculars around the horizontal axis (elevation). When the target was centered in the view the operator pushed the button on the hand grip to the left to send bearing and elevation information to the fire control system. There were bearing and elevation scales so this information could also be passed over the ship's sound powered phone system.

I don't know if these were ever used while I was aboard. We used the air and surface search radars to spot targets before they were close enough to see with the naked eye. Bearing and direction were passed to the MK 37 director for guns and MK 49 directors for missiles. I guess the TDTs would have been useful for finding the bearing to small objects or people in the water.

This thing has been on my to do list for nearly a decade and it is good to finally have it done!

Phil


Attachments:
File comment: TDT front view
TDT 20 Jan 2016 1 small.jpg
TDT 20 Jan 2016 1 small.jpg [ 112.96 KiB | Viewed 1631 times ]
File comment: TDT left rear view
TDT 20 Jan 2016 2 small.jpg
TDT 20 Jan 2016 2 small.jpg [ 108.14 KiB | Viewed 1631 times ]
File comment: TDT front closeup
TDT 20 Jan 2016 5 small.jpg
TDT 20 Jan 2016 5 small.jpg [ 123.13 KiB | Viewed 1631 times ]
File comment: TDT left rear closeup
TDT 20 Jan 2016 7 small.jpg
TDT 20 Jan 2016 7 small.jpg [ 122.49 KiB | Viewed 1631 times ]
File comment: TDT operators view
TDT 20 Jan 2016 8 small.jpg
TDT 20 Jan 2016 8 small.jpg [ 125.49 KiB | Viewed 1631 times ]

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PostPosted: Sat Jan 30, 2016 11:52 pm 
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Here is more of the forward superstructure. This is the O4 level deck house and the Forward Air Control station on the O5 level. Most of this deck house is the original 1944 construction from CL-91. This is about all of the original superstructure that was visible from the outside. With the CLG conversion the huge flag quarters "office building" superstructure was constructed around a core that remained from the original ship after all of the bridges and external structures had been stripped away.

The 1959 CLG conversion included the Mk 34 gunfire director from CL-91. It rested on a massive armored barbette and director tube that extended down to the armored 3rd deck. It was located about where the forward part of the deck house is in these pictures. In 1963 this director, barbette and director tube were removed to reduce topside weight. The Oklahoma City was the only CLG that had this director removed, and it makes an easy way to identify the ship in photos.

After the Mk 34 was removed in 1963 the deck house was cut back to Frame 57 where the side of the house and the life rails curve inward at the shorter of the two vent plenums on the side of the house. At that time it retained some of the platforms on the O5 level from the original CL-91 construction, and a bulwark wrapped around the front of the house. By 1967 the platforms and bulwark had been removed. By 1971 a new compartment had been added to the front of the deck house, extending it forward to 18 inches aft of Frame 55 as seen in these pictures.

This was one of the least photographed parts of the ship. I have a few high resolution photos from inclining experiments and a few lower resolution photos taken from the O4 deck, but none from the O5 level showing Forward Air Defense in detail. Consequently, the accuracy of the details in the control station in the center as depicted here is questionable. The photos show the general structure with fuzzy blobs for individual pieces of equipment. Some show fuzzy details of the wiring. By studying photos from other CLGs, especially the USS Little Rock museum ship, I was able to determine what most of these boxes looked like, although no other ships had them positioned the same as the OK City (the other ships still had the Mk 34 director).

The frame around the station held Plexiglass windows. I have not included the window material here. The unfinished forward superstructure drawing is already 332,497 entities and 2,554,927 points. It takes about 10 minutes to create rendering information after the drawing is opened. Experience has shown me that if I included transparent objects and enabled transparency for rendering it would take many hours to complete an image. The program has to determine if any of the 332 thousand objects and/or their shadows would be visible through each of the transparent objects, and that takes a lot of time.

Like the TDTs, seen in position here, the Forward Air Defense station is one of the mysteries I have been collecting information about for at least a decade. For now it is done. There are still a lot of details to be added to the sides of the O4 deck house.

Phil


Attachments:
File comment: O5 level Forward Air Defense
forward air control small 1.jpg
forward air control small 1.jpg [ 128.84 KiB | Viewed 1599 times ]
File comment: Fwd superstructure O5 level port
forward air control small 2.jpg
forward air control small 2.jpg [ 136.61 KiB | Viewed 1599 times ]
File comment: Forward Air Defense station
forward air control small 3.jpg
forward air control small 3.jpg [ 132.7 KiB | Viewed 1599 times ]
File comment: O5 level looking aft
forward air control small 4.jpg
forward air control small 4.jpg [ 133.54 KiB | Viewed 1599 times ]

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Last edited by DrPR on Sun Apr 10, 2016 11:13 pm, edited 2 times in total.
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PostPosted: Sun Jan 31, 2016 12:48 am 
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Here are two pictures of the forward superstructure with finished hand rails, Forward Air Defense, Mk 37 director barbette and the O5 and O6 levels added. I haven't added the big binoculars, forward radar tower or Mk 37 director yet - these drawings are finished (?) but haven't been added to keep the working file size down.

Still to go - lots of doors, wiring, lights, water wash down plumbing, refueling stations, refueling booms, antennas, search lights, first aid boxes, fire plugs, vent plenums and blowers, stokes stretchers, the Captain's chairs, a bazillion life rafts, ...

Maybe by this time next year it will be done!

Phil


Attachments:
File comment: Forward starboard view
forward superstructure 30 Jan 2016 small 1.jpg
forward superstructure 30 Jan 2016 small 1.jpg [ 138.96 KiB | Viewed 1598 times ]
File comment: Aft port view
forward superstructure 30 Jan 2016 small 2.jpg
forward superstructure 30 Jan 2016 small 2.jpg [ 122.68 KiB | Viewed 1598 times ]

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Last edited by DrPR on Sun Apr 10, 2016 11:14 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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